Self-Publishing News: 7.25.2016

And now for the news!

This week in the world of self-publishing:

“Authors of thrillers and mysteries who have endured the woes of traditional publishing may find that the indie route is the best way to go,” declares Nicole Audrey Spector in this July 22 article for Publisher’s Weekly.  The phenomenon of genre fiction authors finding success within the liberations of self-publishing is nothing new: romance and fantasy/science fiction writers have a long and storied relationship with going rogue in order to escape both the stigmas and the constraints unfairly imposed by the gatekeepers of Western literary canon.  And while crime fiction may come as a surprise to some, but Spector writes that “crime fiction lends itself well to self-publishing, in part because authors can pump out a ton of books in a relatively short time while building and engaging with an active audience online.”  Of course, it’s not without its challenges, Spector notes: “It’s a lot of work, but well worth it for those crime authors whose careers have taken off as a result.”  And those ranks are expanding, as more indie crime writers navigate the muddy waters of self-marketing to become “authorpreneurs.”  For the full story, check out Spector’s article at the link!

Anything with “Maverick women writers” in the title is bound to catch my eye!  Self-publishing has long provided refuge for the marginalized and the oppressed, given voice to those who have no means of their own and no access to the traditional publishing model, so it should come as no surprise that indie publishing has come to attract its fair share of women cut from a different cloth.  Says Maria Corte for Quartz in this July 22 article, chronicling the successes of authors like H.M. Ward, whose nice-guy Damaged series was too “weird” to fit comfortably within the bounds of traditional publishing.  Forced into self-publishing by the nature of her books, Ward met almost immediate (and overwhelming) success–books in the NYT bestseller list, massive sales–all while turning down offers from traditional publishers who wanted to capitalize on her now-proven success.

“Romance novels, home of heavy lids, hot breaths, and grabbed wrists, have long been the embarrassing secret money-maker of the book industry,” writes Corte, “But today, a renegade generation of self-published authors like Ward are redefining the romance novel, adapting to digital in a way that has long-lasting lessons for the book industry.”  The average American reads just 12 books a year, notes Corte, but those who fall in love with the romance genre tend to read far more (including one reader who owns up to reading 5 romance novels a week).  However you look at it, good news for the mavericks turns out to be good news for everyone–the more books a reader consumes, the more they support the publishing industry as a whole, traditional  and indie.  For more of Corte’s article, follow the link.

This week’s last big piece of news comes from Publisher’s Weekly, in Mark Coker’s annual list of trends to watch published on July 22.  “The future of publishing is fraught with opportunity and peril,” Coker warns before launching into his list; making note of the fact that many authors (self-publishing and otherwise) lack a complete understanding of market trends (past and present) and that these trends play a large hand in shaping the success or failure of a book’s sales.

But there’s plenty of good news in store for self-publishing authors, too, says Coker.  One of his ten trends centers on the democratization of publishing and distribution as a direct result of self-publishing: “Ten years ago, agents and publishers were the bouncers at the pearly gates of authordom,” writes Coker.  “Publishers controlled the printing press and the access to retail distribution. Today, thanks to free e-book publishing platforms, writers enjoy democratized access to e-book retailers and readers.”  That’s a rather rousing endorsement if ever I saw one!  And indie authors keep raking in the good news; three more of the ten trends include “The rise of indie authorship,” “Indie authors are taking market share,” and (happily) “The stigma of self-publishing is disappearing.”  It’s also worth noting that Coker closes with one final bit of good news: “Indie authors are writing the next chapter of their industry’s story,” he says.  It’s not all fun and games, however, and Coker warns against the continued power Amazon plays in undermining the individual self-publishing authors’ potential.  For more information, check out the original article here.


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As a self-publishing author, you may find it helpful to stay up-to-date on the trends and news related to the self-publishing industry.This will help you make informed decisions before, during and after the self-publishing process, which will lead to a greater self-publishing experience. To help you stay current on self-publishing topics, simply visit our blog every Monday to find out the hottest news. If you have other big news to share, please comment below.

KellyABOUT KELLY SCHUKNECHT: Kelly Schuknecht is the Executive Vice President of Outskirts Press. In addition to her contributions to the Outskirts Press blog at blog.outskirtspress.com, Kelly and a group of talented marketing experts offer book marketing services, support, and products to not only published Outskirts Press authors, but to all authors and professionals who are interested in marketing their books and/or careers. Learn more about Kelly on her blog, kellyschuknecht.com.

News From the Self-Publishing World: 11/16/15

This week in the world of self-publishing:

In true entrepreneurial fashion, superstar actress and businesswoman Gwyneth Paltrow has decided to start yet another new venture … and this one’s into our world, the world of self-publishing.  According to Andrea Mandell in a USA Today article from November 10th, Paltrow will be calling her self-publishing line “Goop”––the same name as her existing fashion/beauty/lifestyle website.  It’s unclear at this point whether Paltrow will open up the new company for other aspiring authors, and how content will be selected and curated, but for now there are plans in the works for a cookbook and a beauty book at some later date.  Goop (the self-publishing company) will exist in partnership between Paltrow and existing publishing powerhouse, Grand Central Publishing.

On November 11th, Jessie Rosen of Bustle published a meme-rich list of reasons why authors should write that long-delayed YA novel … and now.  I’m happy to report that point #6 is, in her words, “You Can Self-Publish and See Just as Much Success.”  (The accompanying GIF image is, interestingly, pulled from the recent 50 Shades of Grey film––and keeps company with other GIFs on the list from Pretty Little LiarsDivergent, and Harry Potter.  It’s nice to know once and for all that popular culture has officially been infiltrated by Our People.)  Anna Banks and Amanda Hocking also win mentions.  And if this list isn’t enough to convince you that writing a YA novel is a worthwhile investment of time and energy, perhaps it will provide a good dollop of inspiration to publish whatever other kind of book you want to write.  (Hint: it doesn’t have to be YA!)

“There is proper etiquette on approaching a bookseller with a request to stock a self-published title,” writes Sue Corbett in this November 10th Publisher’s Weekly piece on the runaway self-publishing success, The Sheepover.  The joy of this sweet little picture book’s journey to an international market with Little, Brown and Company is in fact a story of the authors’ local Vermont community: when the husband and wife team first approached a local indie bookstore owner with their book, it was an eavesdropping customer who purchased the first copy, pulled in a friend to buy a second copy, and convinced the bookstore owner not only to stock a handful but to write a blog post about the book––a blog post which ended up capturing a lot of attention both at Publisher’s Weekly and among those who subscribe to PW emails.  And those original eight copies?  Paid for by a Kickstarter campaign linked to the authors’––John and Jennifer Churchman––Facebook account.  And if this story doesn’t warm the cockles of your heart, even after the first Autumn snow, then perhaps it will at least inspire you to try self-publishing a picture book of your own!

On a more “serious” newsy note, a decision has been made in respect to a long-running lawsuit leveled against self-publishing supergiant Author Solutions that has far-reaching implications for indie authors looking to publish in the near future.  In his November 13th article for Publisher’s Weekly, Jim Milliot charts the progress of the lawsuit, which was filed in 2013 by three authors accusing the company of fraud, and how this case intersected with the company’s transition to a new president and CEO––Andrew Phillips.  While the case has been dismissed, Phillips admits that he is “happy to be able to focus entirely on growing the company’s business.”  Author Solutions, which was first formed by the merger of AuthorHouse and iUniverse in 2007, has since gone through sequential ownership by Pearson, Penguin, and finally, Penguin Random House.  With all the resources of one of the Big Five publishers behind it, Author Solutions has instituted something called the “Author Care Initiative,” with the goal of improving customer satisfaction and retention in the face of an increasingly competitive market.  And they’ve seen measurable improvement in their numbers, which speaks to the value of actually caring about the authors!  You can read about the full set of measures as instituted by Phillips in the article.


As a self-publishing author, you may find it helpful to stay up-to-date on the trends and news related to the self-publishing industry.This will help you make informed decisions before, during and after the self-publishing process, which will lead to a greater self-publishing experience. To help you stay current on self-publishing topics, simply visit our blog every Monday to find out the hottest news. If you have other big news to share, please comment below.

KellyABOUT KELLY SCHUKNECHT: Kelly Schuknecht is the Executive Vice President of Outskirts Press. In addition to her contributions to the Outskirts Press blog at blog.outskirtspress.com, Kelly and a group of talented marketing experts offer book marketing services, support, and products to not only published Outskirts Press authors, but to all authors and professionals who are interested in marketing their books and/or careers. Learn more about Kelly on her blog, kellyschuknecht.com.

News From the Self-Publishing World: 11/09/15

This week in the world of self-publishing:

In this article for the Irish Times from November 7th, Sarah Keating reviews new titles being released by self-publishing authors Rachel Abbott, Angela Currie, Fat Roland, and Thijs de Boer.  These titles are particularly interesting to Keating because they represent a larger trend––a trend wherein indie and self-published titles have come to amount to roughly 31% of the Amazon Kindle Store’s overall sales figures.  She makes reference to an ongoing lawsuit Amazon itself has filed against “false reviewers” who are paid to boost sales figures for these authors––a lawsuit that may turn up dirt on more than just hybrid self-publishing companies and reviewers looking to earn a little extra cash.  (The consequences could be huge for traditional publishing companies, as well, in that it could either privilege them in the extreme or it could undercut a part of their promotional strategies as well.)  Keating’s reviews are themselves quite worth a look, as are her comments about the new self-publishing discovery tool, MacGuiffin.

Bleeding Cool has long been a litmus test for emerging technologies and paradigms; this week, in a November 5th article by contributor Michele Brittany, the digital magazine documents a panel of indie comic artists and writers at at Stan Lee’s “Comikaze” conference.  The panel, titled “Indie Creators, Unite! A Guide to Self-Publishing” was moderated by Fanboy Comics’ Managing Editor Barbra Dillon and featured Siike Donnelly (Solestar, The King of Neverland), William Orr (Hunter Black), Kevin Bieber (Man vs. Rock), Bryant Dillon (Identity Thief, Something Animal), and Madeleine Holly-Rosing (Boston Metaphysical Society, Kickstart for the Independent Creator: A Practical and Informative Guide To Crowdfunding)––many of whom have become well-known in the comic community, despite their longstanding indie roots.  It’s a happy circumstance that, in comics as well as in prose of all kinds, the self-publishing author now has representation at major industry events!  The panelists answered questions which ranged from “Why is self-publishing so important?” to whether authors should seek publication in digital or print formats, and all of the answers shed new light on the range of possible paths authors can follow in this brave new world of self-publishing.

Last week in a November 2nd piece for Publisher’s Weekly, Daniel Lefferts wrote that “Most authors write books with the hope of reaching a mass audience […] who buy and consume books because they enjoy them,” but recommends authors instead make efforts to “consider another, smaller (but possibly more influential) network—that of ‘professional readers.'”  What he means is, authors––particularly self-published authors––ought to keep the existence of one particular website in mind: NetGalley.  NetGalley, a web-based platform that enables publishers and authors to upload books for review by these professional readers, can be (in Lefferts’ words) “pricey.”  For this reason, Lefferts writes that “it’s best to do some preparation before taking the plunge”––a truth we find applies to more than just this one service.  He also describes in detail how authors might make better use of NetGalley, and how to help make their submissions stand “out from the crowd.”  All in all, very useful information to know!

Eileen Mullan, in this November 4th article for the digitally-based EContent Magazine, reports on the evolution of the publishing path over the last ten to fifteen years.  Mullan, whose own graduate school experience typified a larger “normal,” writes that “the worst part of being friends with a group of writers is that you are constantly seeing talented people who take their craft very seriously get rejected.”  And rejection is, ultimately, what Mullan sees as both a necessary crucible and the greatest trial through which today’s writers (still) must pass––only, Mullan sees a question mark in that sentence.  Is rejection, which underpins the traditional publishing method, really necessary to shape a book into something … “good”?  We know the answer to this one, and Mullan cites Andy Weir’s runaway self-publishing success, The Martian, as an example of a fine book that needed no rigamarole of rejection to reach excellence.  The rest of his article is equally as uplifting––and all the more useful for that.


As a self-publishing author, you may find it helpful to stay up-to-date on the trends and news related to the self-publishing industry.This will help you make informed decisions before, during and after the self-publishing process, which will lead to a greater self-publishing experience. To help you stay current on self-publishing topics, simply visit our blog every Monday to find out the hottest news. If you have other big news to share, please comment below.

KellyABOUT KELLY SCHUKNECHT: Kelly Schuknecht is the Executive Vice President of Outskirts Press. In addition to her contributions to the Outskirts Press blog at blog.outskirtspress.com, Kelly and a group of talented marketing experts offer book marketing services, support, and products to not only published Outskirts Press authors, but to all authors and professionals who are interested in marketing their books and/or careers. Learn more about Kelly on her blog, kellyschuknecht.com.

Self-Publishing Week in Review: 01/20/15

As a self-publishing author, you may find it helpful to stay up-to-date on the trends and news related to the self-publishing industry. This will help you make informed decisions before, during and after the self-publishing process, which will lead to a greater self-publishing experience. To help you stay current on self-publishing topics, simply visit our blog every Tuesday to find out the hottest news.

How Much Can a Self-Publisher Make?

“How much do self-published authors make?” is a common question asked by authors. This Huffington Post article shares income statistics from a Digital Book World report. This is an interesting read for all writers.

Self-Publishing Predictions

This Publisher’s Weekly article discusses expected trends in 2015 and reviews statistics from 2014. This is a must read for all writers.

A Look Ahead to Self-Publishing in 2015

Industry insiders predict an increase in diversity, serialization, and hybrid publishing in 2015, according to this Publisher’s Weekly article. This is a fascinating read for all writers.

If you have other big news to share, please comment below.

ABOUT KELLY SCHUKNECHT: Kelly Schuknecht is the Executive Vice President of Outskirts Press. In addition to her contributions to the Outskirts Press blog at blog.outskirtspress.com, Kelly and a group of talented marketing experts offer book marketing services, support, and products to not only published Outskirts Press authors, but to all authors and professionals who are interested in marketing their books and/or careers. Learn more about Kelly on her blog at http://kellyschuknecht.com.

Self-Publishing Week in Review: 12/17/13

As a self-publishing author, you may find it helpful to stay up-to-date on the trends and news related to the self-publishing industry. This will help you make informed decisions before, during and after the self-publishing process, which will lead to a greater self-publishing experience. To help you stay current on self-publishing topics, simply visit our blog every Tuesday to find out the hottest news.

5 Lessons From a Proud Self-Published Author

One of the best ways to improve your chance of success as a self-published author is learning from the mistakes and triumphs of other self-published authors. In this article, self-published author Jessica Smock shares five lessons that will help you improve your book. Every writer should read her advice.

10 Tips For Self-Publishing A Multi-Contributor Anthology

If you are planning to self-publish a multi-contributor anthology, this is a must read. The author shares 10 tips that will help the project go smoothly and make working with writers easier.

Self-published Seattle Author Tops Amazon Book Category List for Memoirs During Prime Holiday Shopping Season

Being on top of one of Amazon’s book lists is always a huge accomplishment, but to do it during the prime holiday shopping season is even more astounding. This article shares the success story of self-published memoir author  Molly McCord, who reached #2 on Amazon’s Memoirs: Adventurers and Explorers category.

If you have other big news to share, please comment below.

ABOUT KELLY SCHUKNECHT: Kelly Schuknecht is the Vice President of Outskirts Press. In addition to her contributions to the Outskirts Press blog at blog.outskirtspress.com, Kelly and a group of talented marketing experts offer book marketing services, support, and products to not only published Outskirts Press authors, but to all authors and professionals who are interested in marketing their books and/or careers. Learn more about Kelly on her blog at http://kellyschuknecht.com.

Self-Publishing Week in Review: 12/10/13

As a self-publishing author, you may find it helpful to stay up-to-date on the trends and news related to the self-publishing industry. This will help you make informed decisions before, during and after the self-publishing process, which will lead to a greater self-publishing experience. To help you stay current on self-publishing topics, simply visit our blog every Tuesday to find out the hottest news.

Companies book profits from self-publishing

This USATODAY report talks about a social worker who self-published her books, sold hundreds of thousands of copies, and made millions. It also discusses the success of other self-published authors and self-publishing statistics.

Guess Which Amazon Top 100 List Self-Published Women Dominate?

At a recent trade conference, Amazon.com divulged that roughly 25 percent of its U.S. Kindle Top 100 list for 2012 was composed of self-published and “indie” authors. According to stats from this year’s current list, those numbers don’t seem to be budging. This is good news for self-published authors and independent publishing houses across the United States, but the big winner in this news seems to be women authors. This article is a must read for self-publishing authors.

The Self-Publishing Debate: A Social Scientist Separates Fact from Fiction (Part 1 of 3)

The author of this article begins by saying, “If you had asked me a year ago, I would have told you that self-publishing was the road to nowhere.” She goes on to share her research on self-publishing and how her perception of self-publishing has changed. This is a fascinating read for self-published authors.

If you have other big news to share, please comment below.

ABOUT KELLY SCHUKNECHT: Kelly Schuknecht is the Vice President of Outskirts Press. In addition to her contributions to the Outskirts Press blog at blog.outskirtspress.com, Kelly and a group of talented marketing experts offer book marketing services, support, and products to not only published Outskirts Press authors, but to all authors and professionals who are interested in marketing their books and/or careers. Learn more about Kelly on her blog at http://kellyschuknecht.com.

Self-Publishing Week in Review: 12/03/13

As a self-publishing author, you may find it helpful to stay up-to-date on the trends and news related to the self-publishing industry. This will help you make informed decisions before, during and after the self-publishing process, which will lead to a greater self-publishing experience. To help you stay current on self-publishing topics, simply visit our blog every Tuesday to find out the hottest news.

How I Do It: Super Successful Indie Authors Share Their Secrets. This Week: Diane Capri

In this interview, thriller author Diane Capri shares her secrets to success, her upcoming plans, and her tips for other authors. One of her important pieces of advice is “Learn the business.” I couldn’t agree more. It is very important for authors to understand the publishing industry and keep up-to-date on the latest news and trends.

Ten Things I’ve Learned from Evaluating Self-Published Books for a Year

Jessica Bennett, co-creator of Compulsion Reads, shares ten things she’s learned from evaluating self-published books. This article is insightful and a must read for anyone considering self-publishing. Her reflections give authors a glance into the mistakes and successes of other self-published authors and can help writers avoid making the same mistakes.

Companies book profits from self-publishing

This article shares the story of a social worker who sold her self-published books on Amazon. She has been very profitable and successful. This is an interesting read for anyone considering self-publishing.

If you have other big news to share, please comment below.

ABOUT KELLY SCHUKNECHT: Kelly Schuknecht is the Vice President of Outskirts Press. In addition to her contributions to the Outskirts Press blog at blog.outskirtspress.com, Kelly and a group of talented marketing experts offer book marketing services, support, and products to not only published Outskirts Press authors, but to all authors and professionals who are interested in marketing their books and/or careers. Learn more about Kelly on her blog at http://kellyschuknecht.com.