In Your Corner: Top 3 Reasons to Self Publish THIS July

If you have been considering self-publishing your book, this July is the perfect time to take the leap! Here is why.

Patriotism!

July is when Americans celebrate freedom. And even if you’re not American, chances are many of your potential readers are. Celebrate your and their freedom of speech, and share your writing by finally self-publishing that manuscript you’ve been holding on to. Truthfully, self-publishing books is part of many cultures. While it’s totally fair to be proud of your own country’s contributions to the world of words, we hope that you’ll contribute your own words as well.

Independence Must Be Declared!

No matter where you live in the world, the freedoms and independences that you do possess exist for a reason, and new freedoms are only won when existing ones are seized upon! These days, you don’t need an agent or a traditional publisher to get started. And if you don’t feel confident that you’ve got all of the details down, you can always look to a full-service self-publishing company, and get your book published in exactly the way you want it to be.

Live in the Sun!

With summer comes longer days, and July starts just after the Summer Solstice and the longest day of the year. (Or shortest night, depending on how you look at it.) Longer days mean more time to work on your manuscript and get all of the other things done that you need to in life, which in 2020 might be a whole lot of additional things on top of the ones you had originally planned. Take advantage of the extra hours by finally finishing your book––not to mention the special holiday savings many companies offer over the July 4th weekend!

You are not alone. ♣︎

Do you have ideas to share? Please don’t hesitate to drop us a line in the comments section, below.
Elizabeth

ABOUT ELIZABETH JAVOR: With over 20 years of experience in sales and management, Elizabeth Javor works as the Director of Sales and Marketing for Outskirts Press. The Sales and Marketing departments are composed of knowledgeable publishing consultants, customer service reps and book marketing specialists; together, they all focus on educating authors on the self-publishing process to help them publish the book of their dreams. Whether you are a professional looking to take your career to the next level with platform-driven non-fiction or a novelist seeking fame, fortune, and/or personal fulfillment, Elizabeth Javor can put you on the right path.

Self-Publishing News: 6.30.2020

june

And now for the news.

Highlights from this month in the world of self-publishing:

Here’s a bit of encouragement on a slow news week (slow, that is, if you subtract the constant barrage of doomsday-like reports on matters pertaining to health, politics, and the environment). Author Louise Ross, better known under her pen name LJ Ross, has reached the pinnacle of self-publishing success. With 19 best-sellers under her belt at age 35, she came to a crossroads 5 years ago that many writers are facing today as a result of ongoing economic uncertainty and the instability of the job market: What next? This article from Jonathan Owen of iNews covers her story from childhood to present day, and repeatedly highlights what makes her such a great advocate for self-publishing authors. “Being able to self-publish,” Owen quotes Ross as saying, “a fantastic opportunity to be creative but also earn a living from your creativity.” There are also tangible benefits: “I have a six-year-old and it’s nice to be able to be there after school for him,” says Ross. “Having the privilege of flexibility that a career in writing brings is worth its weight in gold.” Her DCI Ryan mystery series has netted her a comfortable 5 (or so) million sales, which she attributes to word of mouth and the excitement of her fan base.

How’s that for inspiration?


spa-news
As a self-publishing author, you may find it helpful to stay up-to-date on the trends and news related to the self-publishing industry.This will help you make informed decisions before, during and after the self-publishing process, which will lead to a greater self-publishing experience. To help you stay current on self-publishing topics, simply visit our blog each month to find out the hottest news. If you have other big news to share, please comment below.

Self-Publishing News: 6.24.2020

june

And now for the news.

Highlights from this month in the world of self-publishing:

Technavio, a business research firm, has just released its latest market research report, titled “Global Publishing Market 2020-2024.” As covered by BusinessWire, Technavio’s report shows that some key trends are already taking shape as a result of COVID-19 are already:

Although the COVID-19 pandemic continues to transform the growth of various industries, the immediate impact of the outbreak is varied. While a few industries will register a drop in demand, numerous others will continue to remain unscathed and show promising growth opportunities. Technavio’s in-depth research has all your needs covered as our research reports include all foreseeable market scenarios, including pre- & post-COVID-19 analysis.

Technavio has provided a free sample report that you can access by way of the BusinessWire press release, and it’s looking rather nice.

2020 Indie Book Award Winners and Finalists Announced!

We’ll keep this short, since half of the fun is browsing the lists and discovering new gems for yourself––but in the middle of hard times, it’s good to know one thing that still holds true: Indie authors are worth your time and money at the bookstore. Some of the titles on this list come from self-publishing companies, and some come directly from authors without any assistance, and now we know what we’ll be doing with the rest of our summer! (Reading these books, of course!)


spa-news
As a self-publishing author, you may find it helpful to stay up-to-date on the trends and news related to the self-publishing industry.This will help you make informed decisions before, during and after the self-publishing process, which will lead to a greater self-publishing experience. To help you stay current on self-publishing topics, simply visit our blog each month to find out the hottest news. If you have other big news to share, please comment below.

Self-Publishing News: 6.17.2020

june

And now for the news.

Highlights from this month in the world of self-publishing:

“Michael Volpatt, the chef-owner of Big Bottom Market in Guerneville, has released a new book, Cooking In Place: 50 Days, Stories, and 70+ Recipes to Keep You Sane in Challenging Times,” writes Sonoma West editor Laura Hagar Rush in the opening to this article. The state of Arizona has been hit particularly hard by the novel Coronavirus, and is still seeing huge spikes and clusters in the number of positive COVID-19 cases––as well as deaths. In the middle of all of this bad news comes at least one bit of good: authors are pushing through, and innovating, and making use of self-publishing even while the world of traditional publishing is still operating at a crawl. Volpatt, writes Rush, “decided to self-publish his new book when established publishers couldn’t meet his demand for a faster turnaround time than normal. ‘My book agent and I would have gone to my current publisher with this, but we decided to bypass traditional publishing so we could get it out fast,'” said Volpatt to Rush. The cookbook chronicles his at-home cooking adventures, which were a Facebook Live hit, and includes both recipes and suggestions for cooking during times of hardship and limited ingredients. This idea is, simply put, genius–and we’re glad self-publishing is around to make its rapid publication possible.

Struggling to keep your kids occupied as you work from home? Simon Brooks of Mom.com might just have one possible solution: writing a children’s book can keep both the adults and kids in a house busy for days, even weeks. It’s not a process, however, without its complications, Brooks admits: “using pictures and illustrations to tell a compelling story in thirty-two pages is not a very easy thing to do. The low word count does not mean that the genre is not a ‘no brainer,’ and there is a lot that goes into writing a good children’s book in such a competitive industry.” He goes on to provide what he calls a “roadmap” to writing one of these little gems, and advocates for self-publishing the finished product, calling it a “comfort” to those in need of a solution. We couldn’t agree more–and if you make use of this international crises to write a book with your kids, please let us know in the comments!

Well, that sounds interesting, doesn’t it? In another fascinating article from Scroll.in, Manish Purohit describes the experience of self-publishing in India during this unfolding COVID-19 situation–and even steps back and reframes the development of self-publishing throughout India’s history as a nation and subcontinent. “Self-publishing in India is as old as publishing itself,” writes Purohit: “Publishers may scoff at this, but deep discounts to authors, subsidy publishing and buyback arrangements have always been available and used. And these terms have always guided publishing decisions.” The process is even easier now, with the availability of so many self-publishing options, and many authors are considering it as their first and preferred option. Says Purohit, “Self-publishing platforms democratised the dissemination of writing and earned a dedicated audience,” and now they may prove ever more important in providing additional avenues to publication outside of traditional publishing houses, many of which will struggle to overcome the increased inventory returns resulting from COVID-19 and will have to resort to publishing what Purohit calls “mostly comprise safe, sellable titles.” Without the modern flourishing of self-publishing alternatives, midlist authors would see ever-shrinking options to get their words out there. Thankfully for all of us, this shutdown happened in 2020, when we are mostly equipped to overcome.


spa-news
As a self-publishing author, you may find it helpful to stay up-to-date on the trends and news related to the self-publishing industry.This will help you make informed decisions before, during and after the self-publishing process, which will lead to a greater self-publishing experience. To help you stay current on self-publishing topics, simply visit our blog each month to find out the hottest news. If you have other big news to share, please comment below.

In Your Corner: The Way Forward

An open book covered with grass and bisected by a road crossing from page to page.

In the middle of such a tough year, we have to confront the question: How do we move forward? What’s next? This endless month of March (a bit of a joke online) continues as we continue to grapple with the effects of COVID-19, and despite recent progress it seems March (that is, everything the month of March brought with it to our part of the world) will continue for quite some time.

So, on March the 102nd, how do we as writers, illustrators, and publishing or self-publishing professionals move forward?

Here I’m going to take a bit of inspiration from two very different works out there in the world: Congressman John Lewis’ challenge to readers in Across That Bridge: A Vision for Change and the Future of America, and the Disney epic Frozen II.

Those who’ve already heard of or read the various books by John Lewis will know that there are many other things we could touch on here, especially given the current state of civil unrest in our country. But for our purposes as a self-publishing blog, what I’m most interested in this morning is what his words have to say to those engaging in the creative act of writing and publishing.

Hard times can be … paralytic. People all over the world are reporting that they find ordinary behaviors and ordinary joys to be much more difficult than usual: reading, writing, working an ordinary day from home (or in a few select states, from a changed workplace). The challenge is going ahead and doing these things anyway, because they’re important and worthwhile to do.

I propose looking at this time, the Age of Coronavirus if you will, through the lens of legacy. We hope that this period won’t last as long as the Civil Rights Era of John Lewis and Martin Luther King, Jr.’s time, of course. But we have no real way of knowing how long either the shutdown/slowdown or the economic impacts of COVID-19 will last–and we can’t keep putting important things on hold. Ultimately, writing is an act inseparable from the idea of legacy. We write things down for the purpose of aiding memory and creating works that will outlast the current moment. The works you are writing now, that we work on putting out into the world now, will aid readers for generations in understanding and processing the events of today, whether Coronavirus-related or not.

So, assuming that others feel the same conviction that I do to keep going–to keep reading, to keep writing, to keep publishing because it both brings me joy to do so and it is worth attempting even if I can’t quite reach the productivity levels that maybe I had before this started–how do we get there? How do we push through?

Here’s where Frozen II comes in.

When I first watched the Disney movie in the theater, I was struck by the scene in which Anna, who thinks her older sister Elsa has died, must confront her sudden loss of purpose and motivation because everything about her had been wrapped up in helping Elsa and ensuring her safety. Her life has been so totally disrupted, her sense of meaning gone. This alone has resonance with the current cultural moment. But what Anna does next is extremely powerful (at least to me!): she convinces herself to get up off the ground and get moving by tackling what comes next, literally, one step at a time.

Video clip of the scene from Frozen II where Anna sings “The Next Right Thing.”

And I think that’s the key for us, too.

Maybe the most useful thing to do isn’t going big, after all. Keep legacy at the back of your mind, perhaps, but you don’t leave a legacy all in one day. It takes time and work and a lot of energy to craft a legacy.

Perhaps the answer is to break your next project down to its component parts, as in, really small component parts. I’m talking so small we’re not even talking about the chapter level. Let’s talk about the sentence level, or talk in terms of time.

This is the way I garden: When I get home (or in these times, more likely go outside) after a long day, I rarely have the energy to consider weeding an entire garden bed in one go, much less all of the various beds in my garden. I tell myself: you can do anything for five minutes. Or ten minutes, if I’m feeling ambitious. Or I take an even more manageable approach: I can pull that one weed I see sticking out of the tarragon bush. I tell myself “It’s okay if that’s all you do right now, but that one thing is so easy you won’t even feel it at all.” And inevitably, once I pull the one weed I see another one, and I tell myself the same thing: “It’s okay if that’s all you do right now, but that one thing is so easy and it’s right there.” By the time I check back in with myself, I’ve weeded far more than I even thought was possible five, ten, or thirty minutes before, and I feel pretty fantastic for having been productive. But I would never have gotten there at all if I’d been looking at the garden and promising to weed for a half hour or more!

Let’s look at writing the same way. Maybe you only sit yourself down at your computer for five minutes at first. Don’t even let yourself think about anything like “I’ll do this five minutes every day“–if you’re feeling deeply unmotivated and sad about it, thinking long-term is poison to the project. You need to build your confidence along with your productivity. One step at a time. Anna didn’t get herself out of that cave by thinking big; she got out of the cave by just taking it one step at a time, and not thinking beyond the next right thing. That’s key.

This may be the only time I ever encourage you to not think too far ahead! Thinking ahead is for people whose brains are free from the adrenaline and anxiety of stressful times. We’ll get back to times of productivity and planning in the future, but for now, please forgive yourself if you’re struggling.

You are not alone. ♣︎

Do you have ideas to share? Please don’t hesitate to drop us a line in the comments section, below.

Elizabeth
ABOUT ELIZABETH JAVOR: With over 20 years of experience in sales and management, Elizabeth Javor works as the Director of Sales and Marketing for Outskirts Press. The Sales and Marketing departments are composed of knowledgeable publishing consultants, customer service reps and book marketing specialists; together, they all focus on educating authors on the self-publishing process to help them publish the book of their dreams. Whether you are a professional looking to take your career to the next level with platform-driven non-fiction or a novelist seeking fame, fortune, and/or personal fulfillment, Elizabeth Javor can put you on the right path.