Self-Publishing News: 3.19.2018 – New Releases!

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And now for the news!

Some highlights from this month in the world of self-publishing, specifically new releases written by self-publishing authors and published by independent presses! Today we’ll be featuring brand-new releases in the Outskirts Press Bookstore!

Today we’re focusing on new releases in Science Fiction, and the first new release we want to highlight is Tom Young’s latest book, Assimilation. This is the second in a series (the Emily Smith Trilogy) dealing with life on a post-environmental-collapse Earth, where the living is hard and friendships are vital. After all, who do you trust when you’re alone on a strange planet? That’s right, this series follows a sort of alien exchange program as Earth’s various governments put in place an agreement with the Andrians to secure peace and longevity on Earth. Jawane, Hanlee, and Persha have become the first Andrians to take part in this exchange, but their story doesn’t end there!

In this second installment, we meet Sara, whose unique brain chemistry places her at the heart of a powerful military industrial complex with the key to humanity’s future.

Next, we have Sue Westgate’s latest Science Fiction book, with a name which might twist your tongue and a story which will make you rethink language entirely. This collection of stories takes place over the course of several standard Galactic Years (GYs) and follows the work of Undercover Investigator Eeryda Daanin and her various companions, acquaintances, and cases as she delves into the crimes of this strange but delightful future. This is a future where nothing is simple, but everything is interesting. Well worth a look!

Last but not least, we have T. L. Howard’s latest book, The Final Choosing. In this heart-pounding novel of the present (with both heavy science fictional and heavy fantastical undertones), shopkeeper Mirah is suddenly catapulted to chosen ruler of the nation of Decera. But her greatest challenge is not one of governance–it is time itself. She must come to terms with–and hopefully master–an ancient prophecy brought to life by an old enemy who seems to outwit her at every turn. Buried in the prophecy is a terrifying and terrible truth: The gods are not what they seem, and everything which makes us human is in question. With time, her old enemy, running out, Mirah must parse the language of the dead and her own friends and fellow-travelers in order to understand the god to whom she has devoted her life, and the place her past and experience has in facing the future.


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As a self-publishing author, you may find it helpful to stay up-to-date on the trends and news related to the self-publishing industry.This will help you make informed decisions before, during and after the self-publishing process, which will lead to a greater self-publishing experience. To help you stay current on self-publishing topics, simply visit our blog every Monday to find out the hottest news. If you have other big news to share, please comment below.

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Book Stores, Book Signings, and Media Events for the Self-published Author

Successful book promotion involves both online and offline sales. There are a number of progressive online book marketing tools available for the self-publishing author today, but the tried and true book signing or media event remains quite viable and a lot of fun. Here we’ll take a look at a 3 part approach to promote your book through media events.

Media events and public appearances can fall into any number of categories and include any number of venues (bookstores, radio interviews, television interviews, writing group speeches, presentations, chat room interviews, public forums, and more).

First things first: identify possible venues. You may begin searching media events through your local bookstore. Local bookstores will often collect event calendars and maintain a list of contact people who provide those opportunities.

Media contacts often send announcements of upcoming events. Keep tabs on those listings and note if any relate in any way to your book content. It’s generally easy to develop correlations and tailor your approach to make your presentation applicable. When contact information is available take the first step and approach the organizer.

The art of selling—be prepared to promote yourself and your work. The true art of selling is bringing helpful and enriching information to people’s lives. In that light, sales takes on nobility. Be proud of promoting. You may not close the deal every time, but be sure to follow-up with every prospective media venue to confirm dates. Selling yourself and your book is a numbers game, and as any salesperson will tell you, the amount of contact is directly proportionate to the amount of sales. Be persistent without being annoying. If, after three or four unsuccessful attempts with a particular venue, move on to another prospect.

Finally, your self-publishing firm may offer assistance. Be sure to check with your representative.

ABOUT JODEE THAYER: With over 20 years of experience in sales and management, Jodee Thayer works as the Manager of Author Services for Outskirts Press. The Author Services Department is composed of knowledgeable customer service reps and publishing consultants; together, they all focus on educating authors on the self-publishing process in order to help them publish the book of their dreams. Whether you are a professional looking to take your career to the next level with platform-driven non-fiction or a novelist seeking fame, fortune, and/or personal fulfillment, Jodee Thayer can put you on the right path.

Book Stores, Book Signings, and Media Events for the Self-published Author

Successful book promotion involves both online and offline sales. There are a number of progressive online book marketing tools available for the self-publishing author today, but the tried and true book signing or media event remains quite viable and a lot of fun. Here we’ll take a look at a 3 part approach to promote your book through media events.

Media events and public appearances can fall into any number of categories and include any number of venues (bookstores, radio interviews, television interviews, writing group speeches, presentations, chat room interviews, public forums, and more).

First things first: identify possible venues. You may begin searching media events through your local bookstore. Local bookstores will often collect event calendars and maintain a list of contact people who provide those opportunities.

Media contacts often send announcements of upcoming events. Keep tabs on those listings and note if any relate in any way to your book content. It’s generally easy to develop correlations and tailor your approach to make your presentation applicable. When contact information is available take the first step and approach the organizer.

The art of selling—be prepared to promote yourself and your work. The true art of selling is bringing helpful and enriching information to people’s lives. In that light, sales takes on nobility. Be proud of promoting. You may not close the deal every time, but be sure to follow-up with every prospective media venue to confirm dates. Selling yourself and your book is a numbers game, and as any salesperson will tell you, the amount of contact is directly proportionate to the amount of sales. Be persistent without being annoying. If, after three or four unsuccessful attempts with a particular venue, move on to another prospect.

Finally, your self-publishing firm may offer assistance. Be sure to check with your representative.

How do I get my self-published book into bookstores?

Traditional book retail stores often look for four things when deciding to order a book or stock a book on their shelves:

1. Availability with a wholesaler like Ingram.
2. A 50-55% trade discount, which means more money for the retail store. The highest trade discount you can set through most effective publishers is 55%, industry standard.
3. A retail returns policy. A few on-demand publishers offer an optional retail returns program. The retail returns option is generally only effective when each of these other criteria are met.
4. Finally, customer demand. Bookstores also require consumer demand for your book. Creating demand, or “buzz,” is up to your promotional efforts – it’s never to early to start planning. In addition to researching your upfront publishing costs, be sure to look also into these two critical things: (1) your book pricing structure and (2) the marketing support available with your publisher.


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Setting up Book Signings as a Self Published Author

How would you like to sell more copies of your book? Would you like to read excerpts from your book to a captivated audience?

Book signings at local bookstores are one of the cornerstone of an author’s post-publication foundation. But how do you set them up?

Organizing book signings, readings, and public appearances is one of the most important parts of a successful marketing campaign.

A book signing or reading is a bookstore event that features you and your latest book. This is your opportunity to meet potential buyers face to face. Plus it adds a personal touch to your promotion efforts.

Many customers may feel more motivated to purchase a copy of your book if they hear it explained or read from your point of view. And the opportunity to get a copy signed by the author doesn’t hurt, either!

Independent book stores and larger chain retailers both organize book signings. Your chances for finalizing an appearance are greater with the local independent stores. They have to compete with larger chains and are therefore more willing to support local (and self-published) authors.

In order to pinpoint potential book stores, check your local newspapers or see if book retailers in your area offer a “calendar of events” or post upcoming events on a public bulletin board.

By asking around for the owner of the store or the communications manager you can typically find the appropriate person with whom to propose your book signing. In many cases, both the large and small retailers will have their events planned weeks or even months in advance. Plan early.

When you have a list of people and/or stores you plan on contacting, prepare your pitch. Have a small script that outlines what your book is about and why people would be interested in meeting you or reading the book. The store manager or PR person will most likely ask. After all, they are not there just to help you. They are there to make money selling books. Tell them why your book will make their store money.

If your subject matter is timely, all the better! Remember, this is the point during which the store manager or book buyer will be screening your presentation skills, either over the phone or in person. If they are not captivated by your presentation, they will have very little faith in your ability to captivate a crowd. Be extroverted and dynamic.

It also helps to be concise. Understand that these are busy people. You want to sell them on your event fast. Have your press release and/or sell sheet ready. It’s helpful in case they ask for a copy or if they ask about specific information about the book. They may want to know the retail price, the discount, and the ISBN number immediately so they can order a review copy themselves prior to deciding.

Provide them with your web site address. They might be impressed enough by your initial marketing initiatives to go forward with the book signing.

Offer to help them with promotion, especially if you’re targeting smaller book stores. They will be more interested in offering to host an event if they know you will be absorbing some of the burden of marketing it. Tell them all your friends and family will be attending the event (and then make sure to invite your friends and family!), and if it’s within the scope of your marketing budget, offer to advertise in the local paper at your expense. Remember, the easier you make it for the book store owner or manager, the more likely they will say yes.

Follow-up with prospective book stores who have not confirmed dates. Selling yourself and your book is a number’s game, and as any salesperson will tell you, the amount of contact is directly proportionate to the amount of sales. So be persistent without being annoying. If you experience three or four unsuccessful attempts with a particular store or person, move on to another prospect.

And don’t forget your signing pen…

Good luck and have fun!
Kelly Schuknecht
https://selfpublishingadvice.wordpress.com