Conversations : The Best of Royalene Doyle (part 2)

Celebrating the Best of Royalene Doyle

and her fantastic Conversations

farewell goodbye waving

Once upon a glorious time, Royalene gave us her backstory as an author and self-publishing expert. And let us tell you, it’s something special. Royalene started out writing genre fiction in her teens, mastering everything from science fiction to mystery to children’s books, before moving on in her adulthood to overcome that age-old tale of a gifted writer facing rejection letter after rejection letter. Her response? To take up self-publishing, of course! There’s a lot more to the story than what we can summarize here, but one of the highlights is her unwavering faith in herself (and other authors) and her own personal vision. Here is a writer who faced challenges so common (or perhaps even universal) to the profession, and out of her own grit and determination and self-empowerment, carved out her own uncommon response … and success! In fact, Royalene has had a lot to say about success over the years, and we can’t recommend reading her posts enough. But for the background and the foundation of who she is as a writer, and where her advice comes as a self-publishing professional? Read this post for sure.

Next up, we wanted to shine a light on some of Royalene’s method. (And also, let’s face it, there’s something just plain winsome about Winnie the Pooh, and Royalene’s reference here is spot on.) 2013 was a splendid year for Royalene posts (a very fine vintage), packed full of insights into how she goes about starting a new book, particularly a new children’s book. She walks readers through the first step (research), then the next (conversation), and the last (money). Each of these steps presents some obstacles for the self-publishing author to overcome, but Royalene’s clearly defined and organized steps might just prove a working blueprint for those children’s book authors who come after her. Well worth a full exploratory read, don’t you think?

Our last post for the day was the logical follow-up to the previous one; in fact, this post was published just one week after, also in 2013 (as we mentioned, a very fine vintage!). It also seems logical to have begun today’s reminisces with Royalene’s own childhood, middled with her method for writing a children’s book, and concluded with that other big component of children’s picture books—a relationship which in many ways defines the entire experience—the relationship between author and illustrator! Royalene delves into her various thoughts about illustrators, including some of her requirements for the relationship and her tips on knowing when an illustrator is right for you. As she mentions in her post, this is foundational to the creative development of a children’s picture book, and it’s just as important to develop a working philosophy or ethic of how to go about finding an illustrator and establishing that relationship as it is to write and publish the book. If you’re thinking of writing, illustrating, or otherwise publishing a children’s picture book this year, we recommend reading Royalene’s post in full!

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That’s all for this week! We’ll be back next Friday as we detail more of Royelene’s greatest hits, as determined by our blog’s analytics. You can follow Royalene’s further adventures by checking out her Twitter feed (her handle is @RoyaleneD) or her website at www.DoyleWritingServices.com. We miss you, Royalene! ⚓︎


Royalene

ABOUT ROYALENE DOYLE: Royalene has been writing something since before kindergarten days and continues to love the process. Through her small business—DOYLE WRITING SERVICES—she brings more than 40 years of writing experience to authors who need “just a little assistance” with completing their projects. She developed these blogs for Outskirts Press (OP) a leading self-publisher, and occasionally accepts a ghostwriting project from one of their clients. Her recent book release (with OP) titled FIREPROOF PROVERBS, A Writer’s Study of Words, has received excellent reviews including several professional writer’s endorsements given on the book’s back cover.
Royalene’s writing experience grew through a wide variety of positions from Office Manager and Administrative Assistant to Teacher of Literature and Advanced Writing courses and editor/writer for an International Christian ministry. Her willingness to listen to struggling authors, learn their goals and expectations and discern their writing voice has brought many manuscripts into the published books arena. December 2017 marked the end of Royalene’s tenure at Self Publishing Advisor. and we will be spending the next few weeks celebrating some of her all-time hits, her most well-received articles for our blog, in thanks for years of generous service.

Weekly Self-Published Book Review: “That Pet Finder Kid Catnapped”

Book reviews are a great way for self-publishing authors to gain exposure. After all, how can someone buy your book if he or she doesn’t know it exists? Paired with other elements of your book promotion strategy, requesting reviews is a great way to get people talking about what you’ve written.

When we read good reviews, we definitely like to share them. It gives the author a few (permanent) moments of fame and allows us to let the community know about a great book. Here’s this week’s book review, courtesy of the Midwest Book Review:

That Pet Finder Kid Catnapped

That Pet Finder Kid Catnapped

Scott Clements

Publisher: Outskirts Press

ISBN: 9781460068513

Synopsis:

Have you ever felt your pets are your only true friends? That’s exactly how thirteen-year-old Chet Parker felt every day of his life. After failing at sports, music, and almost everything imaginable, he gave up on ever finding his place in the world. But thanks to an accidental dose of modified dog DNA, things were about to change for Chet. With a new found connection to his six month old dog Zoe, Chet learns that Mr. Fluffy Pants, the cat of the most popular girl in school, has gone missing. Will Chet’s off-the-wall investigative methods drive him further down the social ladder? Or will they lift him up to claim his spot as That Pet Finder Kid?

A delightful detective story, sure to melt the heart of every pet lover.

Critique:

From sports to music, 13 year old Chet Parker fails at anything he ever attempts to do. He also does not fit in with other kids at school. That’s why he is more into animals because they love you no matter what you do, he thinks. When he takes his dog to the vet something happens and he gets the shot meant for his dog. A short time later he is aware that he can sense what animals around him are thinking and his sense of smell is increased. He learns that Heather, a fellow student, lets him know her cat Mr. Fluff Fluff is gone, and she thinks he has run away. Chet aids her and realizes that for some reason someone has stolen her cat. Later there is a ransom note and now Chet has a purpose, that being who took her cat. Chet also becomes friends with a new neighbor and a severely overweight kid named “Ton” who has the reputation of eating kids he does not like. Scott Clements who works on the hit USA network series “Burn Notice” is also a very talented writer of YA novels this being one of them. Chet and all the characters in the novel are well defined in a story that rapidly moves along to the revealing ending where readers find out who stole the cat. That Pet Finder Kid Catnapped is a first class YA mystery novel that would make a great series of adventures for amateur detective Chet Parker.

reviewed by Gary Roen ]

Here’s what some other reviewers are saying:

I’m an adult reading a young adult novel, but an adult who has some pretty fond memories of YA reading and some books I continually revisit. Having said that, I really enjoyed this journey through a YA mystery with Scott’s characters in “That Pet Finder Kid: Catnapped.” I like the characters, story, and the world these kids inhabit, especially the attention to pets. I think kids reading the book or listening to it will enjoy it, too. It’s a world they know, with the attendant adolescent miseries. But it’s also got some fun mysteries going on that will keep them intrigued. What’s more, they can find their own heroes solving the mysteries and gaining some self-esteem in the process. Worthy lessons for us all.

The pacing is great for readers of every age to enjoy the ride. Middle school kids will enjoy reading it themselves. It’s good bedtime read-aloud stuff for the younger kids: The book can be done in serial selections with enough cliffhangers to have them begging for more. As for me, I’m looking forward to more stories of Chet and his friends, animal and human.

Amazon Reviewer Karen Leckey

Another great children’s book by Scott Clements! Scott has an amazing ability to create fully formed characters that spring to life right from the very first page. I really like the kids in Scott’s books–they’re bright, inquisitive and full of life and personality. The side kick friend in this book was hilarious–I laughed out loud at his jokes and shenanigans all the way through the book.

I recommend this book highly for young teens and younger children. It has a little mystery, a little magic in the way Chet can communicate with his pets, and a nice fast-paced story. And lots of really loving and fun interaction with pets for those of us who love the furry creatures. Can’t wait for the next book from Scott. If you haven’t already read it, I also highly recommend Gasparilla’s Treasure.

Amazon Reviewer P. Wells


Thanks for reading!  Keep up with the latest in the world of indie and self-published books by watching this space every Saturday!

Self Publishing Advisor

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Self-Publishing Week in Review: 03/17/15

As a self-publishing author, you may find it helpful to stay up-to-date on the trends and news related to the self-publishing industry. This will help you make informed decisions before, during and after the self-publishing process, which will lead to a greater self-publishing experience. To help you stay current on self-publishing topics, simply visit our blog every Tuesday to find out the hottest news.

Self-publishing matters, don’t let anyone tell you otherwise

This Science Codex article looks at self-publishing statistics and trends. It illustrates why self-publishing is a viable option for authors and why people should take self-published works seriously. It is an interesting read for all writers.

Is Self-Publishing Good For Women? Study Says Yes!

There has been an increased focus in recent years on sexism in publishing, but there seems to be one corner of the publishing world where women are doing quite well for themselves. According to a recent investigation, self-publishing is helping women break the publishing glass ceiling and have the kind of success that tends to skew very male in the world of traditional publishing.

Google Ads 101: A Guide for Indie Authors

This article provides tips for how indie authors can make the most of Google AdWords to target potential readers. It covers mapping your audience, keywords, bidding, and more. It is a must read for authors interested in using Google Ads to promote their books.

If you have other big news to share, please comment below.

ABOUT KELLY SCHUKNECHT: Kelly Schuknecht is the Executive Vice President of Outskirts Press. In addition to her contributions to the Outskirts Press blog at blog.outskirtspress.com, Kelly and a group of talented marketing experts offer book marketing services, support, and products to not only published Outskirts Press authors, but to all authors and professionals who are interested in marketing their books and/or careers. Learn more about Kelly on her blog at http://kellyschuknecht.com.

Self-Publishing Week in Review: 03/03/15

As a self-publishing author, you may find it helpful to stay up-to-date on the trends and news related to the self-publishing industry. This will help you make informed decisions before, during and after the self-publishing process, which will lead to a greater self-publishing experience. To help you stay current on self-publishing topics, simply visit our blog every Tuesday to find out the hottest news.

Four Reasons to Self-Publish Your Children’s Book

In this Huffington Post article, author and illustrator Sue Shanahan shares what she learned during her publishing journey and why she thinks self-publishing is a great option for children’s book authors. This is a must read for all writers considering self-publishing.

A Recipe for Success: Tips for Self-Publishing Your Cookbook

This Publisher’s Weekly article offers helpful tips for cookbook authors. Topics covered include building a platform, finding your niche, creating a team, and more. It is a must read for authors interested in self-publishing a cookbook.

LAPL, SELF-e, Surprising Stats | Self-Publishing & Libraries

This Library Journal article discusses self-publishing statistics and how they impact libraries. This is an interesting read for authors and librarians.

If you have other big news to share, please comment below.

ABOUT KELLY SCHUKNECHT: Kelly Schuknecht is the Executive Vice President of Outskirts Press. In addition to her contributions to the Outskirts Press blog at blog.outskirtspress.com, Kelly and a group of talented marketing experts offer book marketing services, support, and products to not only published Outskirts Press authors, but to all authors and professionals who are interested in marketing their books and/or careers. Learn more about Kelly on her blog at http://kellyschuknecht.com.

Weekly Self-Published Book Review: Lazarus in the Labyrinth

Book reviews are a great way for self-publishing authors to gain exposure. After all, how can someone buy your book if he or she doesn’t know it exists? Paired with other elements of your book promotion strategy, requesting reviews is a great way to get people talking about what you’ve written.

When we read good reviews, we definitely like to share them. It gives the author a few (permanent) moments of fame and allows us to let the community know about a great book. Here’s this week’s book review by Midwest Book Review:

 laz

Lazarus in the Labyrinth

TR Hanes

Publisher: Outskirts Press

ISBN: 9781432784713

An empty death would be preferable to some. “Lazarus in the Labyrinth” follows Reno Antonin, a man under the weight of his life. As his health continually fails and his family seems to fade away, he is left with a life he views as not worth living. Exploring the idea of consciousness, he seeks a rebirth, not fully understanding what it truly means. “Lazarus in the Labyrinth” is an original read with twists on depression and the drive to start anew.

Weekly Self-Published Book Review: Tell Me a Story

Book reviews are a great way for self-publishing authors to gain exposure. After all, how can someone buy your book if he or she doesn’t know it exists? Paired with other elements of your book promotion strategy, requesting reviews is a great way to get people talking about what you’ve written.

When we read good reviews, we definitely like to share them. It gives the author a few (permanent) moments of fame and allows us to let the community know about a great book. Here’s this week’s book review by Midwest Book Review:

 tell me a story

Tell Me a Story

Bea Gold

Publisher: Outskirts Press

ISBN: 9781432778002

As we face our adult lives, we remember how we got where we are. “Tell Me a Story: Stories from a Childhood in Old New York” is a blend of memoir and art from Bea Gold, as she presents full color artwork throughout, as she shares her youth with readers, growing up a first generation Jewish American in pre-World War II New York City. “Tell Me a Story” has its own unique charm, and is very much worth considering for art and memoir collections.

Weekly Self-Published Book Review: Flash Bangs

Book reviews are a great way for self-publishing authors to gain exposure. After all, how can someone buy your book if he or she doesn’t know it exists? Paired with other elements of your book promotion strategy, requesting reviews is a great way to get people talking about what you’ve written.

When we read good reviews, we definitely like to share them. It gives the author a few (permanent) moments of fame and allows us to let the community know about a great book. Here’s this week’s book review by Midwest Book Review:

 flash bangs

Flash Bangs

Andy Underwood

Publisher: Outskirts Press

ISBN: 9781432783488

Length is not a required ingredient for a good story. “Flash Bangs: A Sparkling Array of Hundred-Word Short Stories” is a collection of short fiction from Andy Underwood, who takes people into the throws tales of episodic drama at readers, charging them with all too common problems like addiction, as well as stories off the beaten path, ghosts stories, pets, and much more. “Flash Bangs” is a choice pick for fans of flash fiction, recommended.