Saturday Book Review: “Read: Decoding the Reading Obstacle – Increase Your Test Scores in Reading and Science”

Book reviews are a great way for self-publishing authors to gain exposure. After all, how can someone buy your book if he or she doesn’t know it exists? Paired with other elements of your book promotion strategy, requesting reviews is a great way to get people talking about what you’ve written.

When we read good reviews, we definitely like to share them. It gives the author a few (permanent) moments of fame and allows us to let the community know about a great book. Here’s this week’s book review, courtesy of Midwest Book Review:

Read: Decoding the Reading Obstacle - Increase Your Test Scores in Reading and Science by Walker Guerrier

Read: Decoding the Reading Obstacle – Increase Your Test Scores in Reading and Science

by Walker Guerrier

Publisher: Outskirts Press

ISBN: 9781478776253

Synopsis*:

This book is design for top students, who have the desire to go above and beyond. I call them the seeds of greatness. The students I grew up who have used this approach are now doctors, scientists, and writers. These particular students became an engineer and doctor. Once you start using this book, your intellect will never be the same. This approach will help you attain your highest potential. Students all over the world use this book as a key to their success.

 * courtesy of Amazon.com

Critique:

A consumable workbook, “Read: Decoding the Reading Obstacle” is especially recommended for both public school, private school, and home-schooling curriculums, and as an ideal, effective, and ‘user friendly’ do-it-yourself study skills improvement manual for college students.

reviewed on the Education Bookshelf of Midwest Book Review ]


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Saturday Book Review: “A Slice of History, Musing on Religion”

Book reviews are a great way for self-publishing authors to gain exposure. After all, how can someone buy your book if he or she doesn’t know it exists? Paired with other elements of your book promotion strategy, requesting reviews is a great way to get people talking about what you’ve written.

When we read good reviews, we definitely like to share them. It gives the author a few (permanent) moments of fame and allows us to let the community know about a great book. Here’s this week’s book review, courtesy of Midwest Book Review:

a slice of history, musing on religion by frans koning

A Slice of History, Musing on Religion

by Frans Koning

Publisher: Outskirts Press

ISBN: 9781478760061

Synopsis*:

A View of the World from Three Continents. . . From a farm in The Netherlands to poverty-stricken Sierra Leone…from the brief peace after the Great War to the horrors of World War II…from Europe to America…this extraordinary book of anecdotal essays ranges through the life of a man who has lived broadly and deeply.

Author Frans Koning shares his observations and impressions on topics ranging from what it was like to be a teenager in a Nazi-occupied country, to his experiences in Africa with the Peace Corps, and his move to the United States. He has experienced the effects of brutality and fear and lived to tell about man’s inhumanity to man. With a perspective gained from three continents, he can see how human experience is both diverse and similar…and how patterns in human behavior emerge, from the Waffen SS to ISIS. Immediately engaging, loosely structured, and retaining a piquant flavor of his native land in a Dutchman’s English, A Slice of History is a uniquely personal yet immediately accessible memoir of life during the most turbulent decades of our time.

 * courtesy of Amazon.com

Critique:

Most Americans know World War II from secondary sources like books, documentaries, etc. or from people they know who were alive at that time. “A Slice of History: Musing on Religion” by Frans Koning is a delicious primary source on how a young man experienced the war in the Netherlands. The dominant theme coming so often from the US public on “How we saved Western Europe” misses the complexities involved for the Dutch and all other liberal minded youth in this part of Europe who lived through this period.

The book is written in the style of letters written to friends, or even a thoughtful diary, is a refreshing reading experience. Koning shares his religious and political thoughts and feelings as he tries to create meaning in the midst of the forces of the war around him. The author’s colorful descriptions of a few of his medical practice experiences at home and in West Africa will certainly raise the reader’s curiosity. His ancestors trace back to the Reformation, as he reflects on his own struggles to understand the Christianity he encountered from parents, country, and Americans when he moved to the US. His long, soul searching for religious meaning caused his involvement with a liberal church. The openness and critical thinking of that religion served his questioning mind well.

Finally the narrative is full of personal details that most Americans could never imagine. This includes discovering the proper placement of straw into his wooden shoes, and how his mother saved Koning’s life from a belligerent Nazi SS officer by bribing him with a ham and a half bottle of gin.

This book causes readers to imagine how they would have reacted to events if they had been there. Overall, anyone interested in WWII will find this to be an excellent excursion into understanding how WWII affected a thoughtful young man.

reviewed by Gary Gustafson of Midwest Book Review ]

Here’s what some other reviewers are saying:

A nice piece of personal contemporary history from early twentieth century Holland (with some WWII drama, also). There are also medical observations from his years as an doctor in the African bush, and thoughtful views on comparative religion. Enlightening and fun as well.

– Amazon Reviewer Aaron Stafford

A personal opinion of the author and his life experiences: Dr Koning is a friend, and has very cogent opinions about the world, based upon his eighty plus years of life and experiences. His observations, in my experience, are keen and penetrating.

– Amazon Reviewer Scott Chester


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Saturday Book Review: “Old Dog, New Tricks”

Book reviews are a great way for self-publishing authors to gain exposure. After all, how can someone buy your book if he or she doesn’t know it exists? Paired with other elements of your book promotion strategy, requesting reviews is a great way to get people talking about what you’ve written.

When we read good reviews, we definitely like to share them. It gives the author a few (permanent) moments of fame and allows us to let the community know about a great book. Here’s this week’s book review, courtesy of Midwest Book Review:

Old Dog, New Tricks: The Story of an Old Shelter Dog Who Got a Second Chance marie yolaine williams

Old Dog, New Tricks:
The Story of an Old Shelter Dog Who Got a Second Chance

by Marie-Yolaine Williams (author)
Richa Kinra (illustrator)

Publisher: Outskirts Press

ISBN: 9781478765332

Synopsis*:

Who Says Old Dogs Can’t Learn New Tricks? Boscoe is an 11-year-old dog who suddenly finds himself at a shelter competing with puppies for potential adopters. When a family finally comes in looking for an older dog, Boscoe can’t believe his ears! Will he find his forever home?

 * courtesy of Amazon.com

Critique:

Who says old dogs can’t learn new tricks? Deftly written by Marie-Yolaine Williams and charmingly illustrated by Richa Kinra, “Old Dog, New Tricks: The Story of an Old Shelter Dog Who Got a Second Chance” is the story of Boscoe, an 11-year-old dog who suddenly finds himself at a shelter competing with puppies for potential adopters. When a family finally comes in looking for an older dog, Boscoe can’t believe his ears! Will he find his forever home? Highly recommended, especially for children ages 6 to 9, “Old Dog, New Tricks” will prove to be an enduringly popular addition to family, elementary school, and community library picture book collections. For personal reading lists it should be noted that “Old Dog, New Tricks” is also available in a paperback edition (9781478761631, $14.95).

reviewed on the Children’s Bookshelf of Midwest Book Review ]

Here’s what some other reviewers are saying:

I love reading this book to my children. It is refreshing to see such diversity in this book. It was heartwarming to read a story about a rescue dog getting another chance. I can not wait to read the more from this author.

Top Ten Reasons I Love This Book and Have Read It Over and Over Again!

I could have done more reasons, but I’m a Dave Letterman fan and I know everyone is pressed for time. Here goes!

10) The writer doesn’t talk down to the audience. If you read a lot of children’s books like we do, you know what I’m talking about;

9) The story is compelling and well written;

8) The book promotes the values we should be instilling in our children. I’m talking about compassion, love, loyalty, a love of learning and reading, and treating animals with respect.

7) There is real diversity in the book, not just background diversity. How refreshing to see a mixed race family in a children’s book;

6) The book teaches how to calculate dog years and that we never stop learning, no matter how advanced in age we are;

5) The illustrations are striking and the whole time I read it I thought to myself this book would also make a great movie;

4) The How You Can Help section at the end of the book supports parents who are not ready for a dog (if now is not the right time for a pet in the house there are so many ways you can help shelter animals) Brilliant!

3) The About the Author’s Senior Dogs Section is adorable. The writer even lists her old dog’s favorite CDs (we love Seth MacFarlane too);

2) The writer discusses loss and the plight of shelter animals in a way that is easy to understand, but still gives everyone hope that we can give these so called undesired pets a second chance at love;

1) Some of the profits will go to shelter animals, and that in itself is reason enough to give it five stars.

The truth is, I would take all the stars in the universe and give them to this book. This book has transformed me into a dog lover!

– Amazon Reviewer Amazon Customer

This book is an instant classic. This book is good on so many levels and reading to my son he absolutely hangs on the reality of the situation at the same time the metaphors on life are not lost on the reader, while the story’s poingency is felt by both. We read stories every night to both of our children and this one has displaced some old standbys (ironic?).

The levels that the writer reaches is rare. In the first respect, you have the story. In the second, you have the writer’s story with her dogs. Finally, you have the respect on how to rescue a dog or contribute.

We are a couple of years away from our first canine addition to our family, but with the help of this well written and beautifully illustrated book I know that my sons already have an appreciation for their future friends.

Speaking of future friends, I can’t wait for the next book in this series to come out. These books will make a wonderful addition to our library and will make a great gift for a lot of our friends.

I give this book my highest recommendation. Great for family reading time.

– Amazon Reviewer Clayton III


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Saturday Book Review: “The Conversations We Never Had”

Book reviews are a great way for self-publishing authors to gain exposure. After all, how can someone buy your book if he or she doesn’t know it exists? Paired with other elements of your book promotion strategy, requesting reviews is a great way to get people talking about what you’ve written.

When we read good reviews, we definitely like to share them. It gives the author a few (permanent) moments of fame and allows us to let the community know about a great book. Here’s this week’s book review, courtesy of Midwest Book Review:

the conversations we never had jeffrey konis

The Conversations We Never Had

by Jeffrey H. Konis

Publisher: Outskirts Press

ISBN: 9781478767299

Synopsis*:

This is the dream of a grandson, who had taken his grandmother for granted, to have a second chance, the opportunity to learn about his family from the only person in the world who knew them, who remembered them. My father remembers nothing about his real parents for they were dead by the time he was nine. Olga, his mother’s younger sister, survived the Holocaust, found my father hiding on a farm in Poland and later brought him to America to raise as her own. He never asked her any questions about his parents. Though I later moved in with Olga for a period of time, I repeated history and never asked her the questions my father never asked. Olga has been gone for more than twenty years, along with everything she could have told me, leaving me with a sense of guilt and profound regret. The Conversations We Never Had is a chronicle of my time spent with Grandma “Ola” and tells the stories she might have shared had I asked the questions.

 * courtesy of Amazon.com

Critique:

The Conversations We Never Had is about the regrets of a son who wishes he’d probed more of his family history while its elders were still able to tell him about the past; but it doesn’t end with the burial of his Grandmother Olga, the last person to have known his father’s Holocaust experiences in Europe.

Instead, it blossoms into an investigation of what was, a realization of what could have been, and a family history that incorporates not only conversations made; but those which should have taken place.

How did the family matriarch make the kinds of decisions that would allow her family to survive, adopting and bringing her nephew (the author’s father) to a new country? How did his father survive under impossible conditions, and how did she find him after the war to bring him to a new life? The author’s regrets of not asking the right questions, only to piece together truths from a patchwork of possibilities decades later, is wonderfully portrayed: “Grandma Ola was the only person in the world who could give me some insight into my father, what he was like as a child, a son – to an extent – as a student, though I knew he must have been exceptional in this regard, given that he overcame a language barrier, simultaneously learning English and the sciences, among his other courses; he did this successfully enough to go to medical school. And yet I never had an in-depth conversation with Grandma about my dad and, for the life of me, I have no idea why I didn’t. At least I could, and did, ask my father these questions as I navigated my way through the biased nature of his responses, to get as much truth as possible.”

Many Holocaust family stories come from the horse’s mouth in the form of reminiscences of parents and grandparents translated through the memories and notes of their descendants. Jeffrey H. Konis adds a new twist to this approach in covering not only the conversations that took place; but those which were unsaid.

As he surveys issues of Jewish livelihood and independence (among many other subjects), Konis comes to realize the forces that shaped and led to his career and life choices, and brings readers into a world enlightened by these discussions of Jewish heritage past and how they were passed down and, in turn, translated into life decisions made by future generations.

The precise links between these translations and applications past to present are enhanced by the author’s introspective assessments of what is presented to him, and what it means for his own life: “If I couldn’t find a Jewish girl to marry, the selection would be greatly enhanced were I to allow myself to marry someone who converted. But what about everything Grandma was just telling me, that even one who has converted is still not the same as one who was brought up Jewish? It made me think of something my dad once said about Grandma Ola. He told me that, yes, she had raised him like a son, but she wasn’t his mother. He said it wasn’t the same.”

The result is more than another Holocaust survival story: it’s a perceptive and examining survey of how ideals, thoughts, traditions and culture are handed down in families, surveying the types of questions asked and those left unsaid, and their impact.

Readers of Holocaust literature and biography will find themselves drawn to the family and personalities surrounding Jeffrey H. Konis and will be particularly delighted to understand how Jewish traditions and family messages helped him shape his own decision-making process.

reviewed by Diane C. Donovan of Midwest Book Review ]

Here’s what some other reviewers are saying:

Jeffrey Konis’ book “The Conversations We Never Had” was a beautiful reflection of a man’s relationship with his ailing grandmother’s sister, who acted as his grandmother throughout his life. Over many conversations, Konis was able to tease out memories of her life and upbringing in pre-WW2 Germany, as the spectre of Nazism started to overtake Germany, with all of the horrors that entailed. These stories helped Jeffrey better understand his grandmother and her sister, as well as his father’s temperament, which was enlightening. “The Conversations We Never Had” highlights the importance of talking with our elders before it is too late, to gain some of their wisdom and to hear the stories which shaped their lives and personalities. It was a lovely tribute to Konis’ forebears, and I would love to read it again.

– Amazon Reviewer Janelle Collins

They were of a generation that longed to forget, that shied away from discussing the horrors inflicted upon their people, and hardly, if ever, voluntarily offered up stories around the Sunday dinner table.Talking about such a painful time brought back the pain. So it is no wonder that Konis’ grandmother, Ola, pushed on with her life, loved her family and chose to live for the day and remain silent on her past and how the Holocaust tore her family apart. Inevitably, though, the author comes to realize and deeply regret the missed opportunity to have those telling conversations about the Holocaust with Ola when she passes away. Konis, however, bases many of the conversations in the book on fact, having a vital resource in his father, who was 9 years old when the Nazis invaded his town. It is a fascinating read and I was quickly drawn in by his depiction of Ola’s youth, her sister and her father. The book certainly makes one stop and think and regret those lost opportunities and conversations with our elders.

– Amazon Reviewer Pamela J.


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Saturday Book Review: “The Thundering Herd: Farm Life in the 1950’s and 60’s”

Book reviews are a great way for self-publishing authors to gain exposure. After all, how can someone buy your book if he or she doesn’t know it exists? Paired with other elements of your book promotion strategy, requesting reviews is a great way to get people talking about what you’ve written.

When we read good reviews, we definitely like to share them. It gives the author a few (permanent) moments of fame and allows us to let the community know about a great book. Here’s this week’s book review, courtesy of Midwest Book Review:

the thundering herd farm life john e peltier

The Thundering Herd:
Farm Life in the 1950’s and 60’s;
Looking Through the Lens of Duty in Vietnam.

by John E. Peltier

Publisher: Outskirts Press

ISBN: 9781478765332

Synopsis*:

These stories begin with brief family histories that bring the Peltier and the Scottish Keillor families together. John was the fifth of the twelve children that Wilburn and Barbara Peltier raised on the flat salt grass prairie of Southeast Texas after they married. The life they created for their family on their rice farm and cattle ranch provided fertile ground for the life experiences that are shared in these settings. At the age of nineteen, naive and fresh from the farm, John was drafted into the U.S. Army.

After surviving boot camp and medical corpsman training, he found himself in Vietnam. John used his time in the military and its experiences as the backdrop to describe life growing up. Writing this book intensified the realization of the valuable life lessons that his family and the farm and ranch taught him. After mustering out of the Army in January of 1969, he settled back into civilian life and finished his education.

Disaster struck in 1969 when his father suddenly died of a heart attack at the age of 54, leaving five of his siblings still at home and all without a father. He discovered the two earthy loves of his live – his wife Janie and the vocation of construction – at the same time and place. As a result, Janie and John have a beautiful family and he birthed Peltier Brothers Construction, a company which has provided a great livelihood not only for him and four of his brothers, but for nephews down into the next generation. Both Janie and the company also taught him lessons he never expected to learn. Those stories, plus an incident with the fangs of a deadly rattlesnake and a light essay on grass and water, are included in this book.

 * courtesy of Amazon.com

Critique:

5.0 out of 5 stars — Nice summer read!

Regretting the loss of family history at the passing of his father, John Peltier set out on a personal journey to preserve the legacy of his family by penning “The Thundering Herd: Farm Life in the 1950’s and 60’s; Looking Through the Lens of Duty in Vietnam”. This series of memoirs spanning his early family history in the 1600’s to the present day is best described as extraordinary in its ordinariness. Once the early roots are established through family lore in the first two chapters, the contemporary Peltier family stories switch back and forth between childhood memories and current (Vietnam war) era events. Not unlike Forrest Gump, you join the Peltier family as they go through life experiencing from a personal perspective events such as Hurricane Carla, the Vietnam war, and the rearing of the next generations through both lean and prosperous times. In this day when everyone has their nose in technology, it provides a warm reflection of what life was like for families growing up in rural Texas in the 50s and 60s when kids would leave their homes and not come back until dinner time and parents did not have to worry that someone would take them.

reviewed by Dr. Eileen R. Garza of Midwest Book Review ]

Here’s what some other reviewers are saying:

A thoughtful, well-written, at times entertaining and educational, book illustrating basic family values that survive specific times or wars. It illustrates the best of American farm life and the kind of citizens it can produce.

This book is also another view of the Vietnam War, showing the human side of the country from a young solder’s point of view. His stories and photos illustrate things that the U.S. Army did to help the Vietnamese people, even the families of the enemy Viet Cong, that the public has not always been made aware. Especially interesting is the section on the author’s visit to the orphanage of the children born to U.S. soldiers. The children were sadly ostracized.

– Amazon Reviewer Amazon Customer

Regretting the loss of family history at the passing of his father, John Peltier set out on a personal journey to preserve the legacy of his family by penning “The Thundering Herd”. This series of memoirs spanning his early family history in the 1600’s to the present day is best described as extraordinary in its ordinariness. Once the early roots are established through family lore in the first two chapters, the contemporary Peltier family stories switch back and forth between childhood memories and current (Vietnam war) era events. Not unlike Forrest Gump, you join the Peltier family as they go through life experiencing from a personal perspective events such as Hurricane Carla, the Vietnam war, and the rearing of the next generations through both lean and prosperous times. In this day when everyone has their nose in technology, it provides a warm reflection of what life was like for families growing up in rural Texas in the 50s and 60s when kids would leave their homes and not come back until dinner time and parents did not have to worry that someone would take them.

– Amazon Reviewer E. Garza


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Saturday Book Review: “My Truths: A Collection”

Book reviews are a great way for self-publishing authors to gain exposure. After all, how can someone buy your book if he or she doesn’t know it exists? Paired with other elements of your book promotion strategy, requesting reviews is a great way to get people talking about what you’ve written.

When we read good reviews, we definitely like to share them. It gives the author a few (permanent) moments of fame and allows us to let the community know about a great book. Here’s this week’s book review, courtesy of Midwest Book Review:

my truths a collection michelle farmer anderson

My Truths: A Collection

by Michelle Farmer Anderson

Publisher: Outskirts Press

ISBN: 978147877793

Synopsis*:

“My Truths” is a masterpiece that reminds us of our humanity. This book welcomes you to partake in a meal that will most certainly nourish your soul; an open invitation to sit at the table with victory and defeat as you turn each page, as you read each phrase. Spend quality time in a world, the architecture planted firmly on a solid soil of magical words. The building, a smorgasbord of positive light and negative energy, all saturated with a very real passion for writing and a zest for living. The contradictions are deliberate and they play along with the theme of life… the ultimate support and unconditional love of a mother in HER clashes with the feeling of not belonging in OUTSIDER. The redemption of WINNING which speaks to insecurities ultimately overshadowed by strengths to BAD BOY- a potpourri of what could have been, and what might be. POISON is a haunting take on the drug epidemic and TOMBSTONE TALKS takes us to a cemetery where we can trust the secrets won’t be shared. My Truths is a book about life, death and everything in between.

 * courtesy of Amazon.com

Critique:

“My Truths” in poetic verse delves into many different aspects of life. Anderson has a unique style that takes readers on a journey thru many things we all take for granted. She deals with children, mothers and daughters, grandparents and romantic relationships. There is much to enjoy in “My Truths” that will hold readers interest to the last poem.

 

reviewed by Gary Roen of Midwest Book Review ]

Here’s what some other reviewers are saying:

This is a great collection of personal, yet relatable, thoughts and feelings. Each poem offers a different perspective on a person or time in Michelle’s life. Some pieces are deep and emotional, while others are inspiring and uplifting. A little something for every moment in life- great mix! You won’t be disappointed!

– Amazon Reviewer Amazon Customer

Written in an inspiring lyrical form. “My Truths” is a wonderful read for any occasion; to feed the spirit and to contemplate. Each poem transmits a personal touch of faith, hope and unique experience.

– Amazon Reviewer Amazon Customer


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Saturday Book Review: “That Weekend in Albania”

Book reviews are a great way for self-publishing authors to gain exposure. After all, how can someone buy your book if he or she doesn’t know it exists? Paired with other elements of your book promotion strategy, requesting reviews is a great way to get people talking about what you’ve written.

When we read good reviews, we definitely like to share them. It gives the author a few (permanent) moments of fame and allows us to let the community know about a great book. Here’s this week’s book review, courtesy of Midwest Book Review:

that weekend in albania peter meehan

That Weekend in Albania: A Road Trip to Intrigue in the Balkans

by Peter J. Meehan

Publisher: Outskirts Press

ISBN: 9781478777090

Synopsis*:

An expatriate family takes a road trip to visit Albania’s historical sites, two months after 9/11 in the only Muslim country in Europe. Despite its historical location at the crossroads between Rome and Greece, Albania is still largely avoided by tourists—the country’s Stalinist past and reputation for money laundering in support of terrorism limits interest, but there are investment opportunities for multinationals.

Tony is working as a manager for a Vienna-based company that is having issues in a contract area near the Kosovo border. Drug and weapon trafficking persist in the former Yugoslavian province’s frontier despite a peace settlement having been reached. Tony hopes this weekend outing will convince his wife that a Mediterranean lifestyle is possible in Europe’s poorest country, and that it might restore some good will with his teenage daughter, who is visiting from a Vienna boarding school. The trip will be their first overnight stay outside the capital, but unbeknownst to him when he is informally asked by his consulate to note any illegalities en route, their destination is now a regional Albanian mafia centre. When Tony’s diplomatic contact becomes an Albanian mafia target, and the organisation hires a hit man to eliminate their problem, the expat suspects his sense of adventure is misplaced, and that dire consequences are still a possibility while the country attempts to modernise.

As Tony tries to deal with family and work issues while travelling across classic ruins and remnants of Albania’s heritage as a Christian bastion prior to four hundred years of Ottoman rule, the conflict to control the growing underground economy heats up. He and his family witness the nearly unknown Mediterranean coast road’s natural beauty, but the remains of an ancient past, and the consequences of the more recent brutal military dictatorship, continue to confront them.

 * courtesy of Amazon.com

Critique:

That Weekend in Albania is a thoroughly researched and well-written work of travel fiction introducing Albania to readers interested in adventurous travel. Peter J. Meehan presents this fascinating Balkan country through two perspectives – an ex-pat family’s, and that of Albanian entrepreneurs trying to create prosperity in a post-Communist world. The family must cope with issues such as midlife crisis and parent-child relations in a context of culture shock, separation, language barriers and an unfamiliar environment. The businessmen do not hesitate to use questionable means to achieve their ends, within a framework of recent conflict and ancient loyalties. Several thriller-like episodes, featuring fast cars on bad roads, furnish jolts of excitement. Altogether, this book is an interesting and informative vicarious journey through a new and unfamiliar country.

reviewed by Audrey Driscoll of Midwest Book Review ]

Here’s what some other reviewers are saying:

At first I thought that I wanted to keep reading T.W.I.A. because it revived memories of when I visited Peter in Tirana. Later, I realized that I wanted to keep reading because this is a very good, entertaining story. His geographical, cultural and historical descriptions are accurate, his characters real. I’m looking forward to Peter’s next book.Given his life around the world I’m guessing that he’ll have lots to tell.

– Amazon Reviewer Keith James

Well researched and full of detailed information on a largely unknown country. Added perspecies from foreigners and Albanians make for an interesting read. The fictional story of crime keeps the pace going between a story of a father daughter relationship. Highly recommended.

– Amazon Reviewer Amazon Customer


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