Self-Published Book Review: “Burial on Water Box Mountain”

Book reviews are a great way for self-publishing authors to gain exposure. After all, how can someone buy your book if he or she doesn’t know it exists? Paired with other elements of your book promotion strategy, requesting reviews is a great way to get people talking about what you’ve written.
When we read good reviews, we definitely like to share them. It gives the author a few (permanent) moments of fame and allows us to let the community know about a great book. Here’s this week’s book review:

burial on water box mountain herman white

Burial on Water Box Mountain

by Herman H. White

ISBN: 9781478710097

cipa evvy fiction action adventure

Synopsis*:

Imagination…or Something Real? Fourteen-year-old Joseph has no idea that his life is about to change in ways he couldn’t have imagined. Things haven’t always been easy for him; his mother is a controlling tyrant, and he is having some similar experiences with a teacher at school. He’s learned to find an inner core of courage and resilience…and those qualities will be tested to the utmost when he embarks upon a wilderness adventure to prove that his beloved dog was killed by a creature that nobody else knows about. Joseph’s family accuses him of having a wild imagination, but Joseph knows the truth…the spirit of his dog returned to tell him about the creature, and Joseph is determined both to prove that it is real, and to avenge the death of his dog. Follow Joseph on his trek into the compelling wilderness of Water Box Mountain, as he moves from the nostalgic atmosphere of rural life into an adventure full of natural beauty, survival skills, and excitement. A superb read for young adult and adult readers, Burial on Water Box Mountain is a modern fable that the whole family can enjoy.

 * courtesy of Amazon.com

Featured Review

Amazing Story About Trusting in Oneself No Matter What!

This book I really enjoyed as it was such an exciting read, I could not put this book down from start to finish! The main character, Joseph is telling the story of his determination to find a creature (ape) that killed his dog. No one believes Joseph, but this does not stop him from believing in himself and his gut feelings and searching for this creature. .
This book is about a journey of a teenager who wants to discover truths in life and face his fears and learn. For me, I became so wrapped up in the story because the author made Joseph come alive!

What I love about this book is the moral/lesson: To believe in oneself and be determined to go forward no matter what. This is a fun read and an inspiring read.

This is a must read for all ages, for me, I loved the ending.

Highly recommend this book!

– Reviewed by Amazon Hall-of-Fame Reviewer Daisy S.

Other Reviews

As an adult, I enjoyed it, too!

– reviewed on Amazon by Norlinda Ann Conroe

Burial on Water Box Mountain by Herman White

– reviewed on Amazon by Anthony

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Self-Published Book Review: “The Master Hacker”

Book reviews are a great way for self-publishing authors to gain exposure. After all, how can someone buy your book if he or she doesn’t know it exists? Paired with other elements of your book promotion strategy, requesting reviews is a great way to get people talking about what you’ve written.
When we read good reviews, we definitely like to share them. It gives the author a few (permanent) moments of fame and allows us to let the community know about a great book. Here’s this week’s book review:

steve burkart the master hacker

The Master Hacker

by Steve Burkart

ISBN: 9781478786719

next generation indie book awards

Synopsis*:

There are hackers, and there is THE hacker … the one who can end warfare as we know it, or start a war only she can win. When SunHee Nham, a disaffected North Korean computer scientist working in China, decides to escape her conscription, she takes a few secrets with her. Her dream of living in freedom in the U.S. begins to prey on her mind when she thinks about the hardships under which her fellow countrymen are forced to live. After a chance meeting with John Darque, the head of a covert organization charged with maintaining the balance of power in the world, the two form a partnership to destroy a weapon system she developed for use against Western nations. When she becomes aware of pursuing Chinese agents, she knows her freedom will be short lived. To make matters worse, she realizes her association with Darque’s group will put it in danger of being exposed. SunHee’s noticeable depression changes for the better when Darque poses a plan to turn the tables on a group of rogue nations intent on using the technologies she developed to blackmail the rest of the world. She agrees to help Darque with his plan in the hope that the results will create the spark of change needed to better the lives of her countrymen. However, with change comes sacrifice, and sometimes the price of sacrifice can be very high.

 * courtesy of Amazon.com

Featured Review

In The Master Hacker by Steve Burkart, a Chinese aircraft had crashed while trying to land at a North Korean military base. The north blamed South Korea for the incident, heightening the existing tension between the two countries. Head of a covert organization, John Darque is intrigued by the news and decides to investigate it together with his team. When hacker SunHee Nham arrives in the U.S. and visits her cousin and uncle, Darque and his team’s involvement is sealed when they get rid of two Chinese agents who were on her trail. Now, SunHee has to decide whether she should trust Darque and cooperate with him to topple the agenda by several rogue nations while ensuring the success of her own plan.

The first chapter of this plot-driven espionage thriller delivers a great opening for the story concept, where protagonist SunHee flees her native country, and not without saying ‘goodbye’ to her military superiors as the plane she boarded takes to the air. It gives us the first insight into her persona and her skills. The plot is well-structured and there’s plenty of action. Characterization is solid, even though I relate more to SunHee compared to other protagonists. I found some parts of the dialogue a bit stilted and am slightly ambivalent about the monikers for some of the characters. That said, the dialogue as a whole is to the point, and the moral and ethical discussions between Darque and SunHee are interesting. All in all, The Master Hacker is engaging from start to finish, a riveting book with thought-provoking espionage and intrigue enough to make us question the ‘facts’ behind the news we receive from the media.

– Reviewed by Lit Amri for Readers’ Favorite

Other Reviews


John Darque and his team, a covert troop in charge of maintaining the power balance in world, will need every resource available to determine the cause of an international incident -the sudden crash of a Chinese aircraft attempting to land at a military base in North Korea.

SunHee Nham, a North Korean computer scientist working for the Chinese government, flees the constrictions of her life in China for the freedom offered in the United States. Though she doesn’t regret her decision to leave China, she is aware that her freedom will be short-lived because she knows too much. SunHee is plagued by the hardships suffered by her countrymen in North Korea and will do whatever she can to change the status quo.

The unlikely duo of Darque and SunHee, join forces and work together, albeit reluctantly, each with their own agenda. Each must consider at what point the stakes become too high for peace.

I really enjoyed The Master Hacker. It is energetic and thorough without being bogged down with overwhelming technical jargon. The story shines in the details of the covert operations and the advances made in technology. It’s frightening to think that the technological developments described in the story could ever be true; it certainly made me take pause. The author served 22 years in the military, most of his career as a counter-intelligence agent during the Cold War, and his expertise is clearly displayed in the intricate portrayal of events.

While the storyline was realistic and engaging, I personally would like to have seen greater focus on some of the characters. Though outwardly authentic and typical to the genre, I found myself yearning for a deeper connection with the characters, which would have generated a greater interest in their cause. Perhaps readers learned more about protagonist John Darque in Burkart’s first novel, The Orchestration. As well, some of the nicknames held by certain characters caused a few eye rolls – Glitch, Yoda, Bugs, etc., but I found the reasoning behind the names quite entertaining.

Overall, I found The Master Hacker by Steve Burkart to be a highly entertaining espionage thriller with lots of action, and a major plot twist I never saw coming.

– reviewedby Sheri Hoyte on Seattle PI

Espionage genre with a contemporaneous twist

– reviewed by Chuck on Amazon

 


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Self-Published Book Review: “My Nana Was a Free-Range Kid”

Book reviews are a great way for self-publishing authors to gain exposure. After all, how can someone buy your book if he or she doesn’t know it exists? Paired with other elements of your book promotion strategy, requesting reviews is a great way to get people talking about what you’ve written.
When we read good reviews, we definitely like to share them. It gives the author a few (permanent) moments of fame and allows us to let the community know about a great book. Here’s this week’s book review:

My Nana Was a Free-Range Kid by NAncy Peek Youngdahl

My Nana Was a Free-Range Kid

by Nancy Peek Youngdahl

ISBN: 9781478704928

mom's choice award silver

Synopsis*:

My Nana was an Outrageously Mischievous kid. In the 1940s and ’50s, children were allowed to run free, play outside, and use their imaginations-without parents constantly hovering over them and fearing for their safety. In her own small town in North Carolina-with very little traffic, and neighbors who actually knew each other-Nana was no exception to the free-range kid phenomenon. But as an outrageously mischievous child that was left to her own devices, she sure got into some amazing and hilarious adventures. It was a glorious time to be a child! Both of Nana’s parents worked, so she and her brother were often unsupervised. They wreaked havoc most of the time, thus living an exciting childhood. Nana’s stories-told to her great-grandchildren-are all true. She relates how her family and neighbors survived in spite of her and is quick to let her great-grandchildren know what not to do. As she says, if she had lived as a child today, she’d probably be locked up in a juvenile home!

 * courtesy of Amazon.com

Featured Review

Her Nana was a lot like me when I was young.  I climbed trees, hung out by the creek, rode my bicycle, played in the barn and did anything I could to keep from being bored.  No one worried about me.  Life was different then.

The author shared a copy of this book with me for review (thank you).  It has been published and you can grab a copy now.

Nana climbed trees and hung from them mimicking the trapeze artists in the circus.  When she falls and knocks all the breath out of her, her brother helps her recover.

They also pretended her brother was a lion tamer and she was a lion, but the platform collapsed.

The worst thing they did was make a small fire and cook marshmallows. They thought they put the fire out, but it restarted and burnt the woods.  Never play with fire!

Nana has even more adventures you can read about.  Do you have a free range kid in your household?

– Reviewed by Jo Ann Hakola on The Book Faerie

Other Reviews

Non-Fiction recounts of the author’s free-range childhood in the 1940s & 50s, and the amazing and hilarious adventures initiated with my younger brother. The author lived an active childhood and wreaked havoc all around her neighborhood. The beautiful illustrations in my book could tell the stories without a printed word. This book is narrated by the author’s great-granddaughter who declares over and over her love for her grandparents and how important they are in her life. Her Nana’s yarns tie in many different lessons in what “not to do” and the themes throughout the book will surely hold imaginations long beyond the last page. Today’s child needs to know that family history is a very valuable commodity and should never be forgotten.

– reviewed on bookreviewbuzz

The events shared by “Nana” in this book will open opportunities for grandparents to relate stories about their own childhood.

– reviewed by Linda Ratcliff on Amazon

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Self-Published Book Review: “Caledonia Switch”

Book reviews are a great way for self-publishing authors to gain exposure. After all, how can someone buy your book if he or she doesn’t know it exists? Paired with other elements of your book promotion strategy, requesting reviews is a great way to get people talking about what you’ve written.
When we read good reviews, we definitely like to share them. It gives the author a few (permanent) moments of fame and allows us to let the community know about a great book. Here’s this week’s book review:

Caledonia Switch steven lane smith

Caledonia Switch

by Steven Lane Smith

ISBN: 9781478700821

reader views reviwers choice award 2014

Synopsis*:

A precocious teenager named John Wesley Hardin illegally day trades options to save his father’s hardware store in idyllic Caledonia, New Hampshire.  Clinging to vestiges of infantile omnipotence, John sets up a sham trust to hide his fraudulent schemes.  Early successes entice him to make increasingly risky bets that threaten to ruin three families – the Hardins, the Lavals, and the Harringtons.  When his fundamental identity is exposed as a fiction, his confidence is shattered.  He must choose humility over pride to rebound from disaster to be capable of loving and worthy of being loved.

 * courtesy of Amazon.com

Featured Review

A Christmas Story for All Seasons

– Reviewed by Jennifer Hass for Reader Views

Other Reviews

Caledonia Switch is a book you will truly enjoy reading

– reviewed by T.W. Price on Amazon

Great Read

– reviewed by Boston Book Girl on Amazon

 

 


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Self-Published Book Review: “The Magic of Christmas – The Magic of Love”

ook reviews are a great way for self-publishing authors to gain exposure. After all, how can someone buy your book if he or she doesn’t know it exists? Paired with other elements of your book promotion strategy, requesting reviews is a great way to get people talking about what you’ve written.
When we read good reviews, we definitely like to share them. It gives the author a few (permanent) moments of fame and allows us to let the community know about a great book. Here’s this week’s book review:

the magic of christmas the magic of love by susan brougher

The Magic of Christmas – The Magic of Love

by Susan Brougher

ISBN: 9781478737612

Synopsis*:

Susan writes of adventures common to children, and fondly recalled by many adults. Her rhymes flow sweetly along with the illustrations and are written in a format easy to read to children or for helping a child beginning to read for themselves. Cat lovers will relate to Stealthy Cat that climbs, and then descends the Christmas tree, and they will be tempted to adlib sharing experiences of their own.

Susan’s poems display loving family relationships. Growing up, many of her days were spent playing with her sister, two brothers, and neighborhood friends. Being outdoors in nature gave Susan the inspiration she needed to express her feelings through writing. Winters brought lots of snow and the making of snow angels as she swished her arms and legs while looking up at the sky dreaming, snowflakes falling, melting on her face. Like many little girls then and now, she loved dolls. She recalls having only a few, her favorite being Tinker Bell, who sprinkled fairy dust as she flew.

Susan writes in her first book, The Strongest Bond, that while growing up she believed in the magic of love that could wave a wizard’s wand, and change her from a scullery maid into Cinderella. In this book of beautifully illustrated poems for children, she looks to captivate imaginations with Christmas memories of when she was a child. She shares them in the spirit of the magic of Christmas.

 * courtesy of Amazon.com

Featured Review

A Christmas Story for All Seasons

–  Reviewed by Micki Peluso on Amazon

Other Reviews

Delightful Poems, Great Artwork, Fabulous Choice for Parents & Grandparents for Christmas Gifts

– reviewed by Andy Anderson on Amazon

Heartwarming poems with great illustrations

– reviewed by LASeoulGuy on Amazon

 

 


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Self-Published Book Review: “Christmas Secrets”

Book reviews are a great way for self-publishing authors to gain exposure. After all, how can someone buy your book if he or she doesn’t know it exists? Paired with other elements of your book promotion strategy, requesting reviews is a great way to get people talking about what you’ve written.
When we read good reviews, we definitely like to share them. It gives the author a few (permanent) moments of fame and allows us to let the community know about a great book. Here’s this week’s book review:

christmas secrets by uncle pappy

Christmas Secrets

by George R. Kuper AKA Uncle Pappy

ISBN: 9781478799108

Synopsis*:

Secrets of Christmas Revealed! This edition of Christmas Secrets is a first in a series of Christmas books. This book allows adults and children alike to enjoy discovering the secrets of the holiday season together. Many of the children’s questions about Santa Claus and the Christmas season are answered. The stories are interactive with prompts and questions to encourage children to think, analyze and become involved in the adventure

 * courtesy of Amazon.com

Featured Review

Adorable Throughout – Great for Interaction with Kids

–  Verified reviewed on Amazon

Other Reviews

Interactive Christmas Story Focused on Entertaining Discussion

– reviewed by Al on Amazon

Wonderful Christmas Story

– reviewed by Greg on Amazon

 

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Happy Thanksgiving! … & Your Weekly Self-Published Book Review: “Aurora of the Northern Lights”

thanksgiving

Book reviews are a great way for self-publishing authors to gain exposure. After all, how can someone buy your book if he or she doesn’t know it exists? Paired with other elements of your book promotion strategy, requesting reviews is a great way to get people talking about what you’ve written.
When we read good reviews, we definitely like to share them. It gives the author a few (permanent) moments of fame and allows us to let the community know about a great book. Here’s this week’s book review:

aurora of the northern lights holly hardin

mom's c

gelett burgess children's book award gold

Aurora of the Northern Lights

by Holly Hardin

ISBN: 9781432724399

Synopsis*:

Come along as author Holly Hardin conjures a mystical world of adventure, sprites, and magical charms. After losing her parents, little Aurora sets off on her own. Because she’s different, Aurora finds it difficult to find anyone who will listen to her story, even at Christmas time. As her story continues, Aurora receives special gifts to keep her safe and important clues to find her new home.

Follow the journey as Aurora encounters a host of creatures along the way–including one very famous bearded man. What follows in this beautifully illustrated and delightfully written book is a heartwarming story of a home lost and found–and a Christmas lesson for us all.

 * courtesy of Amazon.com

Featured Review

Reviewed by Grace (age 5) and Ella (age 4) Gleichner and Mom

“Aurora of the Northern Lights” is the story of a young girl named Aurora.  Aurora’s parents meet in the cold lands of the Northern Fey.

Grace: “It’s cold and snowy here, do you think this is where the Northern Fey live Mom?”

Ella: “Maybe they live in the North Cold (what Ella calls the North Pole).”

Aurora’s father, William, becomes sick in the cold so her mother, Mistletoe, agrees to move to a farm where the weather wasn’t so cold.

Ella: “We moved but it’s still cold here, just like in Manitowoc.”

Mistletoe and William are thrilled with the birth of their daughter Aurora, and for seven years everything is wonderful.  But, then all three of them get sick and Aurora’s parents don’t survive.

Grace: “That is so sad.  That’s why we get shots, so we don’t get sick, right Mom?  Are her Mom and Dad in Heaven now?”

Aurora feels lost, and when she wanders into town the people of the town shun her.  She doesn’t know what to do when suddenly a witch gives her a charm to protect her from harm, and tells her that this is not her true home, she needs to head to the forest.

Ella: “What a pretty necklace!”

She does head to the forest, where she does meet some Fey.  But, these are not her people and they too tell her to move on.  But, their queen provides her with a nice wool cloak and oak staff for her journey.

Grace: “At least she’ll be nice and warm.”

After traveling through the bitter cold, Aurora is about to give up when she comes upon a castle.  When she knocks, the door is opened by Santa Claus.

Grace: “Look Mom, Santa!  I can’t wait until he comes!”

Ella: “Don’t forget to put a cotton ball on my calendar so I know how many more days.”

Santa invites Aurora in where she is welcomed by all, but she then sees a woman who looks like her.  This woman is so happy to see her, because she is her Grandmother.

Overall I thought that “Aurora of the Northern Lights” by Holly Hardin was a well-written book; the only issue I had was that little Aurora was only seven when her parents died, and she was on her own and shunned by adults.  But, it does show children that life isn’t always easy, and even if you are different you can always find people who will love you no matter what.

– reviewed by Reviewed by Grace, Ella, and Mom on Reader View Kids

Other Reviews

“Named for the Northern Lights, Aurora faces a woeful plight. To many lands, she must roam, searching for her true home.”

Aurora of the Northern Lights is a delightful story, beautifully illustrated and told entirely in verse.

Aurora is the child of a beautiful and pale young Northern lady named Mistletoe and handsome William, a visitor from the South. William finds the Northern climate difficult, so they make their home in the temperate South.

When Aurora is orphaned, she is unable to stay in her old home. As she searches for her new home, those that she meets along the way are quick to chase her off. To some extent the story is one of intolerance. But fortunately, with perseverance and luck, Aurora finds a place where she is welcomed and loved.

I found the book a fun and engaging read. I imagine that the pictures and verse will go over very well with children. I highly recommend Aurora of the Northern Lights.

– reviewed by Gabi317 on Starting Fresh NYC

Aurora of the Northern Lights is a beautiful and touching story that is destined to become a Christmas favorite amongst young and old alike.

Mistletoe is an elfin living in the North, who falls in love with William, a human. When it becomes obvious that William is not built to live in such frigid conditions, Mistletoe leaves home to live with William a little further South, in a little town.

After a few years, they welcome a darling baby girl, whom they name Aurora, after the Northern Lights (Aurora Borealis) under which they were married. When tragedy strikes, Aurora is left to fend for herself. She doesn’t quite fit in anywhere, and commences upon a journey to find a place she belongs.

Throughout her adventures, she meets several people who shun her from their communities, yet bestow upon her gifts to help her along her way.

After trekking through ice and snow for days on end, Aurora finally comes full circle, finding the place she truly belongs.

The story is written completely in verse that flows on paper, as well as when read aloud. You cannot help but be filled with a variety of emotions as the story ebbs and flows through the happiness and the heartache.

Illustrations by Donald Vanderbeek add to the beauty and poetry of Holly Hardin’s words. They are beautiful and elicit as much emotion as the story itself.

Children will be held captive by the words and the pictures when this book is read aloud to them. It inspires visions of families cuddled together on the couch, wrapped up in blankets on a cold December night, sipping hot chocolate, as they share the story. It could even inspire young authors and artists to create their own story.

I received a copy of this book when I was a reviewer for BookPleasures.

– reviewed by Andrea Coventry on Amazon

 


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