Conversations: 7/21/2017

IT’S JULY!

TIME TO CELEBRATE OUR FREEDOM TO WRITE! III

Long ago I figured out that I needed examples of whatever I was attempting to learn. Of course, my algebra 101 teacher was thrilled to give me all the examples I could fit into my folder. With her help, I quickly concluded that “higher math” was not the path that would lead me into a satisfying career. However, the reading assignments (examples of excellent writing) given to me by English and History professors definitely opened new horizons for me. Each book gave me the FREEDOM to safely explore eras of war, famine, faith and pioneer courage—and imagine what my life might have been like had I lived in those times.  So, today, I offer you examples of excellent writing in the genres of Memoir and Fiction (action). These books are from self-published authors who took advantage of their FREEDOM to publish when, where and how they wanted—giving us fresh perspectives that can enhance our own book projects.

Larry Clayton tells us that his book My Memories Are My Testimony is “the true tale omy memories are my testimony larry claytonf a working man from a working-class family who never forgot from where he came,” including his “youthful misadventures that involved drugs, shoplifting, and a little bit of hustle.”  However, at some point in his young life he realized he had the FREEDOM to choose his next steps which took him into an Air Force career followed by his adventures in the corporate world. This inspirational and compelling memoir is proof that a man’s life need not be defined by his beginnings. Proof that the freedoms we enjoy—written into the Declaration of Independence—are alive and well today.

contra legem s michael siegalS. Michale Siegal is another amazing self-published author who has now produced his second fiction novel: Contra Legem. After retiring from nearly thirty-six years in law enforcement, Siegal has dedicated this novel to all of the men and women behind the badge who daily serve and protect our communities.

His main character, Officer Harold Cohen, has become a police officer, a very nontraditional occupation for Jewish men and women. So even though the scenarios of the story are fiction, Siegal’s personal life experiences and education bring significance and value to each chapter. This is especially true as Officer Cohen deals with the concerns of a mother who does not believe Jewish boys should become policemen, but would rather he find success as a minister, doctor, lawyer or entrepreneur. This highly accurate portrayal of the day-to-day life of a police officer demonstrates the balance they must find between a person’s heart desires, family and career—a career that literally has criminals aiming guns in his direction.

These two authors are, indeed, excellent examples of writers who have the purpose and desire to publish. They are following in the footsteps of highly successful “independent authors” such as Irma Rombauer who printed her book, The Joy of Cooking, in 1931 with A.C. Clayton, a company that had never printed a book before. Both the author and those company owners were practicing their FREEDOM to print want they wanted published; and such independent thinking remains “alive and well” with authors and self-publishing houses this very day. I am blessed to be a part of this Freedom Legacy, and I hope you are—or will be—too. ⚓︎

 


Royalene

ABOUT ROYALENE DOYLE: Royalene has been writing something since before kindergarten days and continues to love the process. Through her small business—DOYLE WRITING SERVICES—she brings more than 40 years of writing experience to authors who need “just a little assistance” with completing their projects. This is a nice fit as she develops these blogs for Outskirts Press (OP) a leading self-publisher, and occasionally accepts a ghostwriting project from one of their clients. Her recent book release (with OP) titled FIREPROOF PROVERBS, A Writer’s Study of Words, is already receiving excellent reviews including several professional writer’s endorsements given on the book’s back cover.
Royalene’s writing experience grew through a wide variety of positions from Office Manager and Administrative Assistant to Teacher of Literature and Advanced Writing courses and editor/writer for an International Christian ministry. Her willingness to listen to struggling authors, learn their goals and expectations and discern their writing voice has brought many manuscripts into the published books arena.

Conversations: 7/14/2017

IT’S JULY!

TIME TO CELEBRATE OUR FREEDOM TO WRITE! II

Once upon a time there was a teacher. Her “student-teaching experience” sent her to a high school where she was assigned to a class of “low-performing students.” Walking into that classroom was a moment mixed with fear, courage and hope. She already knew that one student had allegedly threatened a previous teacher with a gun; and didn’t know what to expect from the others. Yet, from that very first day, she saw potential in each and every student. Her dream to “be a teacher” became her hope to help them find a FREEDOM they never dreamed possible—through writing!

The next school year—now a full teacher—she was assigned a sophomore class. That was the year of student “walk-out” protests because of political unrest. She listened to her students, and asked them to keep journals and write about the similarities of the “family feuds” they experienced at home or knew of in gangs to the families of Romeo and Juliet. She also gave reading assignments of books written by other teenagers in times of war: Diary of a Young Girl by Ann Frank, Zkata’s Diary by Zlata Filipović and Night by Elie Wiesel. Writing these journals helped many of the students as they anonymously passed copies of pages around the classroom and shared their thoughts. Slowly, these students, who once refused to even speak to someone who looked different, became like a family.

You may have heard of this woman—teacher, encourager, speaker, writer. Her name is Erin Gurwell, and she and her students created the book, The Freedom Writers Diary: How a Teacher and 150 Teens Used Writing to Change Themselves and the World Around Them. The book was published in 1999 and remains a “go to” assignment for many teachers, today. I must admit that when I read book, some of the words made me feel uncomfortable; yet, I learned much about the circumstances of these wonderful young people. The movie Freedom Writers was released in 2007. And, there is now the Freedom Writers Foundation that encourages the Freedom Writers method of writing around the world.

freedom writers erin gruwell

OUR COUNTRY, and that Declaration of Independence document, set the stage for Erin Gurwell to dream of and become an amazing teacher more than 200 years later. Her education was filled with the writings of professors, poets, novelists and memoir authors. And she—like the American Revolution patriots—became an unforgettable example of how hard work, courage and the spirit of determination can change lives, and writing was the main tool she used.

Are you an out of the box thinker and writer like Erin Gurwell and the authors of the Declaration of Independence? If you answered, “No, not really,” please consider the following:

  • Do you enjoy brainstorming plot ideas? I have a neighbor who loves to read mysteries. So when my plot runs into a wall, I sit with her a while, and ask what she likes best about the plot of the book she’s reading. Those 30-60 minutes kick my brain into gear and my own plot comes to life again.
  • Do you like to re-write the endings of your favorite TV shows or movies? My husband (who has done some acting) and I really enjoy discussing “how we’d write that story.” Almost without exception those ideas find their way into my notes for an article, short story or novel.
  • Are you learning new things? Each and every time we research background information for our stories we are stepping out of the box of our genre and into the realm of new ideas.

Without exception, every writer I’ve ever met and/or worked with has enhanced my own abilities and given me new ideas—enriching my personal freedom to write new and better works. May we all appreciate and grow in our FREEDOM WRITING, and FREEDOM PUBLISHING, too! ⚓︎

 


Royalene

ABOUT ROYALENE DOYLE: Royalene has been writing something since before kindergarten days and continues to love the process. Through her small business—DOYLE WRITING SERVICES—she brings more than 40 years of writing experience to authors who need “just a little assistance” with completing their projects. This is a nice fit as she develops these blogs for Outskirts Press (OP) a leading self-publisher, and occasionally accepts a ghostwriting project from one of their clients. Her recent book release (with OP) titled FIREPROOF PROVERBS, A Writer’s Study of Words, is already receiving excellent reviews including several professional writer’s endorsements given on the book’s back cover.
Royalene’s writing experience grew through a wide variety of positions from Office Manager and Administrative Assistant to Teacher of Literature and Advanced Writing courses and editor/writer for an International Christian ministry. Her willingness to listen to struggling authors, learn their goals and expectations and discern their writing voice has brought many manuscripts into the published books arena.

Conversations: 7/7/2017

IT’S JULY!

TIME TO CELEBRATE OUR FREEDOM TO WRITE!

WOULD YOU give up your freedom—your physical freedom—if you were threatened with imprisonment or death if you kept writing and continued to publish your work? I’ve often wondered if I have the stamina and courage it takes to make such a commitment. I’ve also wondered about the writers of our own Declaration of Independence who risked not only their lives (and the lives of their families and friends) in penning of those words.

In November of 1775, when the Continental Congress was attempting to negotiate “fair terms” with “the Homeland,” Thomas Jefferson wrote this statement: Believe me, dear Sir: there is not in the British empire a man who more cordially loves a union with Great Britain than I do. But, by the God that made me, I will cease to exist before I yield to a connection on such terms as the British Parliament proposes; and in this, I think I speak the sentiments of America.

Did he know those were “fightin’ words?” Probably. There had already been fighting in the city streets and countryside (Boston Tea Party, 1773), and there would be more because British Commanders were ordered to make it plain that Parliament was the “supreme authority” and anything that Parliament did was constitutional. However our colony ancestors had developed different ideas—that citizens had “fundamental rights” that no government could violate, not even Parliament.

So it was that by 1774, writers, such as Samuel Adams, James Wilson and Thomas Jefferson produced documents stating that the colonies, with their own legislatures, were connected to the rest of the “empire” ONLY through their allegiance to the Crown.

What would have happened if WRITERS—men and women whose skills and abilities allowed them to “wordsmith” the thoughts of a nation—had not accepted their role? What would have happened if these writers refused to listen to the hopes of Freedom that drove their families across the ocean? Only about half the women colonists were able to write, however, they spoke loudly through Abigail Adams (wife of John Adams) who sent him a letter while he attended the Second Continental Congress. “Remember the ladies” while you’re shaping this new nation, she wrote. If you don’t “we are determined to foment a rebellion and will not hold ourselves bound by any laws in which we have no voice or representation.”journal mug coffee

Thomas Paine agreed with her about having a voice and published his Common Sense pamphlet (50-pages) that urged Americans to fight not only against taxation but for their independence. It sold more than half-a-million copies within a few months’ time.

The legacy we writers hold in our hands and hearts, as we develop the genres we’re drawn to, is as close to home as our living rooms and the pages we read to our children and as far-reaching as future generations will carry it—whatever format that might look like. With all my heart, I encourage you to write, and publish! You are the only person on this planet who can produce the works that are spinning in your thoughts.

The world is waiting. ⚓︎

 


Royalene

ABOUT ROYALENE DOYLE: Royalene has been writing something since before kindergarten days and continues to love the process. Through her small business—DOYLE WRITING SERVICES—she brings more than 40 years of writing experience to authors who need “just a little assistance” with completing their projects. This is a nice fit as she develops these blogs for Outskirts Press (OP) a leading self-publisher, and occasionally accepts a ghostwriting project from one of their clients. Her recent book release (with OP) titled FIREPROOF PROVERBS, A Writer’s Study of Words, is already receiving excellent reviews including several professional writer’s endorsements given on the book’s back cover.
Royalene’s writing experience grew through a wide variety of positions from Office Manager and Administrative Assistant to Teacher of Literature and Advanced Writing courses and editor/writer for an International Christian ministry. Her willingness to listen to struggling authors, learn their goals and expectations and discern their writing voice has brought many manuscripts into the published books arena.

Conversations: 6/30/2017

DON’T FORGET AUTOBIOGRAPHIES AND MEMOIRS!

Just yesterday, a neighbor asked me a few questions about the “easy way” to pull the time-frames together as he writes his Memoir. Then he wondered: “Is a memoir the same as an autobiography?”

There was a time in my early writing career when these two categories were quite different, the memoir focusing on one brief period of time in someone’s life and the autobiography creating as complete a picture (from birth to present time) of a living person’s whole life. However, today, all the major bookstores I visit combine these two genres in one area: Autobiographies. So does Amazon, even to the point of blurring the lines between all three classifications (biographies, autobiographies and memoirs).

However, as I did my research for this month’s blogs, I came across an interesting quote from the famous writer Gore Vidal who wrote two personal memoirs: “A memoir is how one remembers one’s own life, while an autobiography is history, requiring research, dates, facts double-checked.” I like the clarity of that definition, and plan to use it when talking with future clients. So it is that I’ve given myself a brief bullet point outline and will share it with you today.

The Memoir:

  • Written in 1st person—the “I did this” perspective.
  • Uses less formal language/word choices.
  • Focuses on one (or two) main events/times in a person’s life, but can include birth date and short paragraphs of early memories.
  • Speaks from the more emotional perspective—how they felt when events occurred.
  • Dates/places may not be exact, such as: I was about 33 when I began this career.

The Autobiography:

  • Although “written by” the individual person(s), it often requires the assistance of a “collaborative writer.” Superb example: Having Our Say by Sarah and Elizabeth Delany with Amy Hill Hearth (Amazon lists this as a biography when it is clearly an autobiography. Grrr)
  • Offers their life history from birth to present day.
  • Written with detailed chronology facts of personal, political and/or world events, places, and the people they met and interacted with along the way.
  • Authors must also consider who they are writing this book for—their audience—and what aspect of their life is most useful to those Readers.

When I was teaching in a school setting (versus my workshops today), I loved to lunch with the teachers of World History and American History. These inspired people were always telling me about the latest autobiography (or biography) they’d discovered. Of course, the first autobiography they assign to students is Ann Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl. “These books not only reveal historic events,” one teacher told me, “they demonstrate the strength people have to survive great tribulations in life which shows our students that they, too, can survive life’s challenges.”

the diary of anne frank

SO…have you added a bunch of books to your resources bookshelves this month? I hope you’ve selected a few. The individuals you’ll be reading about will, indeed, enlighten you and the author’s writing techniques will be instructive, too. Take time to talk with your local librarian about these genres and the people (subjects) who might be most interesting to you—who have lived in a time period you’re intrigued by or succeeded in a career that is appealing to you.

Then…once you’re comfortable with the flow of these books, look around for potential clients. I’ve worked with a ninety-year-old who could tell me his life stories all day long and barely need a break for lunch. And, I’ve worked with a gentleman who gave me several pages he started writing “years ago,” then gave me additional outline points, but passed away before we could meet again. Yes, being the “writing assistant” to people seeking help with these genre categories of writing can be an emotional rollercoaster. Yet, I wouldn’t trade those days/months for anything. My writing skills and abilities have been sharpened by the experiences and so will yours. ⚓︎

 


Royalene

ABOUT ROYALENE DOYLE: Royalene has been writing something since before kindergarten days and continues to love the process. Through her small business—DOYLE WRITING SERVICES—she brings more than 40 years of writing experience to authors who need “just a little assistance” with completing their projects. This is a nice fit as she develops these blogs for Outskirts Press (OP) a leading self-publisher, and occasionally accepts a ghostwriting project from one of their clients. Her recent book release (with OP) titled FIREPROOF PROVERBS, A Writer’s Study of Words, is already receiving excellent reviews including several professional writer’s endorsements given on the book’s back cover.
Royalene’s writing experience grew through a wide variety of positions from Office Manager and Administrative Assistant to Teacher of Literature and Advanced Writing courses and editor/writer for an International Christian ministry. Her willingness to listen to struggling authors, learn their goals and expectations and discern their writing voice has brought many manuscripts into the published books arena.

Conversations: 6/23/2017

WRITE THEIR STORIES:

Developing the Biography, Part IV

STUDY your favorite biographies! These authors have walked this path before us and have much to teach us. Plus, their works are useful illustrations of both the art of biography and adjusted techniques of storytelling. Just a few days ago I received a marvelous little book on the life of Jules Verne. It is a library hardcover edition for “young readers” age eight to twelve. It is, for me, a very concise outline of how to write a biography—one that is quickly accessible and understandable for any age or writing community interested in writing biographies. The title is: Who Was Jules Verne? by James Buckley Jr. (There is a whole series that start with WHO WAS. I’m certain you’ll find one or more to enjoy.)

However, don’t forget the biography classics. Included in my collection is author Jean Fagan Yellin’s narrative biography of Harriet Jacobs: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. For writers who wish to develop realism in their novels about the early history of America, or any biography attached to this time period, this book is essential reading. Yellin is admired for her “groundbreaking scholarship” in the writing of this book because it “restores a life whose sorrows and triumphs reflect the history of the nineteenth century.” Can you even imagine hearing your words acclaimed as bringing someone’s life back to life?

Although the majority of the biographies/memoirs that I may write will, most likely, never reach the acclaim that this book has, I approach the writing of it as if it will—as if this person is the most important person on the planet.

One of my all-time favorite writers is C. S. Lewis and until recently there has been only one highly acclaimed biography of his life: JACK: A life of C. S. Lewis by George Sayer. Within these pages are found instructive information nuggets about writing on many levels. However, recently, a new book has arrived on the scene titled: C. S. Lewis and the Art of Writing by Corey Latta. It is already being heralded as “…a treasure trove of eminently practical advice for the aspiring writer, and fills readers with a poignant sense of the nobility of the writing vocation.” It is also shorter than any of the others I’ve seen about Lewis! I can hardly wait to get my hands on a copy!

biography of john carey muriel kinney and carol kinney grimes

Each of the four books mentioned above will offer writers unique insights to build our own biography writing skills. And yet, I offer you one more to bring into your resources collection. The title is: The Biography of John Carey by Muriel Kinney and Carol Kinney Grimes. These ladies became passionate about their family ancestry—the heritage they are carrying forward. Because they wanted to honor their grandfather, they’ve written the story of one of America’s pioneers and, in doing so, offer readers detailed history lessons we’d never find in a textbook.

This is what I love about well written biographies—the blend of storytelling and well-researched historic facts. This is how a whole lot of other Readers also learn history—as they take our books home!

What I hope you’ll take away with you today is that Biography writing IS FUN! Writing within this one genre we can enjoy the writing techniques of other genres such as: children/young adult books, American (or any country’s) ancient to current history, books on “the writing life,” and personal genealogy. Who is the person who has captured your interests? What questions would you ask them if you stepped into a Starbucks and saw them sitting there? Make a list of people and questions today! Contact your local librarian to find out what has already been written about that person. Your approach to their story will be distinctive. It needs to be written and published! ⚓︎

 


Royalene

ABOUT ROYALENE DOYLE: Royalene has been writing something since before kindergarten days and continues to love the process. Through her small business—DOYLE WRITING SERVICES—she brings more than 40 years of writing experience to authors who need “just a little assistance” with completing their projects. This is a nice fit as she develops these blogs for Outskirts Press (OP) a leading self-publisher, and occasionally accepts a ghostwriting project from one of their clients. Her recent book release (with OP) titled FIREPROOF PROVERBS, A Writer’s Study of Words, is already receiving excellent reviews including several professional writer’s endorsements given on the book’s back cover.
Royalene’s writing experience grew through a wide variety of positions from Office Manager and Administrative Assistant to Teacher of Literature and Advanced Writing courses and editor/writer for an International Christian ministry. Her willingness to listen to struggling authors, learn their goals and expectations and discern their writing voice has brought many manuscripts into the published books arena.

Conversations: 6/16/2017

WRITE THEIR STORIES:

Developing the Biography, Part III

SO…what are the most important things to include in a biography without getting lost in the research? Most writers I know literally love doing research no matter what genre they’re currently working in. However, researching the lives of people who are no longer living—and, yes, those who are still on the planet—can be intriguing to the point of obsession. If you’ve ever delved into your own genealogy you know exactly what I’m talking about.

The best way I’ve found to keep on track is to prepare a question outline then briefly answer each one. This is what it looks like.

  • Who is my client? The actual person I’m writing for? OR a relative of theirs? OR is this an assignment from a publishing house? What are their expectations for the length of the book and the due dates for 1st draft, 2nd draft and final?
  • What is the purpose of this biography? Is the focus on infant to early adulthood? Their career? Their ministry? Their “fall” into a troubled life?
  • When (what time period) did they live in? Does the client want specific information about what was happening in the world during these years?
  • Where will I be developing this work? Has the client hired me to visit the locations where the subject lived between birth and death?
  • Why? WHY have I accept this project? Do I have a personal interest in this subject/person or certain elements of their lives?

Once I’ve briefly answered those questions, I move forward to my next set of queries. These are very basic and, again, answer them as briefly as possible.

  • Who is the subject of this book? Name. Place and date of birth and death (if applicable).
  • What is this person’s “claim to fame?” Major achievement(s).
  • When did they attend school? Which schools? Any outstanding awards?
  • Where did they live? Did their community acknowledge them in any way? Did their name appear in local newspapers? Why?
  • Why did they choose their career path? Or…were there multiple careers? Any significant contributions to those fields?

With the responses to these set of questions you will be creating a Basic Timeline of this person’s life. These facts will keep your manuscript from wandering. Although sidebar pieces of information—that relate to a different time in the subject’s life—are often added throughout a biography, it is essential for the writer to be extremely clear about when things happened. If the when-facts become jumbled a biography becomes useless.

At this point of manuscript development I suggest writers contact their client and review the direction they want the book to go. ASK them who they want this book to speak to—who will be the reading audience. This is another critical piece of information for the writer because it sets the TONE for your work—how you will creatively shape the story you’re about to write.

Biography writing is an exciting genre and one that will utilize every writing skill you have. It is also a genre much sought after by libraries around the world giving the writer/biographer an excellent platform from which to promote all your writing abilities. I encourage every writer to develop at least one biography in their career. It is, indeed, an amazing journey! ⚓︎

copywriting vs. proofreading


Royalene

ABOUT ROYALENE DOYLE: Royalene has been writing something since before kindergarten days and continues to love the process. Through her small business—DOYLE WRITING SERVICES—she brings more than 40 years of writing experience to authors who need “just a little assistance” with completing their projects. This is a nice fit as she develops these blogs for Outskirts Press (OP) a leading self-publisher, and occasionally accepts a ghostwriting project from one of their clients. Her recent book release (with OP) titled FIREPROOF PROVERBS, A Writer’s Study of Words, is already receiving excellent reviews including several professional writer’s endorsements given on the book’s back cover.

Royalene’s writing experience grew through a wide variety of positions from Office Manager and Administrative Assistant to Teacher of Literature and Advanced Writing courses and editor/writer for an International Christian ministry. Her willingness to listen to struggling authors, learn their goals and expectations and discern their writing voice has brought many manuscripts into the published books arena.

Conversations: 6/9/2017

WRITE THEIR STORIES:

Developing the Biography, Part II

WHEN I became interested in writing Biographies (sometimes called Memoirs) I had no idea how to find a client who wanted their stories told. So I filed away the best idea resources I’d collected for that genre and got busy writing other projects. About a year later I received a phone call from the editor of a small newspaper. I’d sent a brief “thank you” note to her applauding their cover story about a local woman linotype operator and how a neighbor was helping her write a book about her life. This editor informed me that my note would appear in their “Letters to the Editor” column the following month. She would also be including my business website and contact information because “we need more people like you who will help folks write their life histories.” WOW! Such a nice surprise; it still warms my heart when I recall the exchange.

That one contact led to eleven (11) queries. Although only one became an actual client that year, I am forever grateful for being nudged into the biography-autobiography-memoir writing business. Until you’ve experienced it yourself, it is difficult to understand the depth of joy and satisfaction it brings to the “writing assistant.” And, that is what we become: writing coach and editor, research assistant, creative storyteller, hand-holder and friend/brother/sister/counselor.

SO…how do you set yourself up as a writer of biographies?

I much prefer the personal contact avenues—as you might guess from the example above. However, if you’ve considered writing “for” other people, you’ve probably created a website and may be a member of one or more Facebook writing communities. Other ideas are:

  • Research FREELANCE WRITING sites where you can submit your resume for FREE.
  • Consider your own interests while asking yourself “What makes a person famous enough to make the effort to write a biography?” Do you have biographies on your bookshelf? I have several biographies of authors I admire. Is there an author you admire who doesn’t have a biography (or autobiography) out in the world yet? Might be worth it to contact them.
  • Look at a variety of Literary Agencies that specialize in biographies (or other genres you enjoy). If you’ve ever talked with an agent, you already have an idea how many queries they receive from people who need help. Send them your resume with an excellent cover letter.
  • Check out your favorite traditional and self-publishers and query them about becoming part of their ghostwriting team. You will need to read every word in their “contractor agreements” then decide for yourself if that is what you want. They are an excellent resource because people who need professional writing assistance will contact their favorite publisher for advice.

IF you are just beginning to test the waters of biography writing, you may need that surprise one-on-one meeting that leads to signing a client. Someone recently mentioned to me that they found their first biography client in a college library. The peaceful and intellectually stimulating environment allowed her to become acquainted with several staff librarians and one of them handed her the contact information for someone “needing help to write their grandfather’s biography.”

For me, biography/memoir writing is a very personal experience. It is the respect we have for the individuals we write for that makes the pages come alive. Our lives will be quite different than those we’re writing about and it’s critically important not to “put a modern-day spin” on what they’re sharing. Through this process we become better writers and—I believe—better human beings. As you connect with each new biography client, may the leather of their shoes and the ground along their path bless you with new insights. ⚓︎

writing poetry in the woods, national poetry month 2016


Royalene

ABOUT ROYALENE DOYLE: Royalene has been writing something since before kindergarten days and continues to love the process. Through her small business—DOYLE WRITING SERVICES—she brings more than 40 years of writing experience to authors who need “just a little assistance” with completing their projects. This is a nice fit as she develops these blogs for Outskirts Press (OP) a leading self-publisher, and occasionally accepts a ghostwriting project from one of their clients. Her recent book release (with OP) titled FIREPROOF PROVERBS, A Writer’s Study of Words, is already receiving excellent reviews including several professional writer’s endorsements given on the book’s back cover.

Royalene’s writing experience grew through a wide variety of positions from Office Manager and Administrative Assistant to Teacher of Literature and Advanced Writing courses and editor/writer for an International Christian ministry. Her willingness to listen to struggling authors, learn their goals and expectations and discern their writing voice has brought many manuscripts into the published books arena.