Conversations: 5/19/2017

WRITE YOUR CHILDREN’S BOOK TO TEACH!

Teaching is IN my DNA. I also believe it is in the DNA of every author. Last week I wrote about developing messages of encouragement in our Children’s books utilizing themes that, while reinforcing good qualities, also teach our young readers “how-to” cultivate habits that will benefit them throughout their whole lives. It is my premise today that Teaching and Encouraging need to be synonymous purposes at the core of our children’s books. The inquiring minds of our children need to be exposed to only the best of content and quality writing techniques.

So it is that first, I’ll offer a couple of websites to writers who will take their writing gift seriously enough and go the extra mile to research what is currently perceived as the best quality of Children’s, Juvenile and Young Adult books on the market. The following Parent’s websites, are created to “clue us in” to what our children find on bookshelves and online bookstores today.

http://www.scholastic.com/parents/resources/article/guides-to-reading/parent-guide-to-book-genres-fantasy Here I found an excellent combination of classic and current book titles as well an several well-thought-out discussion points that will help me discuss stories with my grandchildren. It also leads to other parts of the Scholastic site for further research.

https://www.commonsensemedia.org This site offers “practical tips for parents of exceptional readers” to help parents (and teachers—and writers) find age-appropriate books to challenge and engage the “thinking” reader.

THEN we have the book: The New York Times Parent’s Guide to the Best Books for Children. The 3rd revised edition was released in 2000, and the 4th should be coming out any time now. However, the information available in this one is well worth having at your fingertips because it is organized in six sections according to reading level: Wordless, Picture, Story, Early Reading, Middle Reading, and Young Adult.

IF you’re writing in the Juvenile/Young Adult genres, you already know that the task of creating a quality story—that sells—is a challenge. Today’s youth appreciate very different worlds from the adventures of western lawmen or the deep jungle exploits of Tarzan or the daring explorations of sci-fi heroes like John Carter. Here are a few threads that connect past writing successes with current Reader-expectations:

  • Hidden Treasure: The intrigue of unknown wealth continue to draw the attention of Readers.
  • Surprise Discoveries: Whether the surprise comes in the form of dragons, or elves or giants, young readers will come back for more.
  • Family and Friends: Juvenile and young adult readers are trying to figure out how these relationships work. Give them excellent examples.
  • Develop REAL characters in REAL situations—even if the world they’re living in is a fantasy planet. This will give your Readers the opportunity to “step into the pages” of the story and (again) figure things out (maybe in their real lives) for themselves.

RESEARCH AND REMEMBER WHO ARE READERS ARE. We’re writing for our neighbor’s grandchildren who spend a lot of time in virtual words (online or purchased video games) where the “action” is extremely fast-paced and almost anything can (does) happen. However, these same children are also going to school and studying fractions. The stories we write for them can (should) help them balance their lives and prepare them for adulthood⚓︎

children's picture books
Children reading a book sitting on the roof of the house. Boy and girl reading by the light of a flashlight at night.

Royalene

ABOUT ROYALENE DOYLE: Royalene has been writing something since before kindergarten days and continues to love the process. Through her small business—DOYLE WRITING SERVICES—she brings more than 40 years of writing experience to authors who need “just a little assistance” with completing their projects. This is a nice fit as she develops these blogs for Outskirts Press (OP) a leading self-publisher, and occasionally accepts a ghostwriting project from one of their clients. Her recent book release (with OP) titled FIREPROOF PROVERBS, A Writer’s Study of Words, is already receiving excellent reviews including several professional writer’s endorsements given on the book’s back cover.  

Royalene’s writing experience grew through a wide variety of positions from Office Manager and Administrative Assistant to Teacher of Literature and Advanced Writing courses and editor/writer for an International Christian ministry. Her willingness to listen to struggling authors, learn their goals and expectations and discern their writing voice has brought many manuscripts into the published books arena.

Conversations: 5/12/2017

WRITE YOUR CHILDREN’S BOOK TO ENCOURAGE!

Today I’d like to bring in concepts about THEME within the genre of Children’s Books.

LITTLE BLUE TRUCK by Alice Schertle was my youngest grandson’s favorite books since he could crawl to his box of books and select one. The writing of it and the illustrations (by Jill McElmurry) follow the pattern of Keep it simple, Keep it focused, Keep it moving to a Tee. It was first published in 2008 and listed in the genres of “ages 4-8” and “baby, pre-school.” THE THEME centers on being a good friend. Sometimes being a friend is easy and fun. Sometimes it’s not. Willingness to try being a friend is always a good thing to do and often helps make new friends. Every time I read this Little Blue Truck adventure to my grandson, I (me—the adult) am encouraged to work on my own friendship skills and behaviors. Yes, indeed, this book will forever be part of my library!

SO…what was/is your favorite children’s book? When I ask writers this question many reply with titles like Bambi, and Dumbo, and Lassie, with words that come out sounding like they are cuddling with a Teddy Bear. They are remembering the Little Golden Book Classics now being passed forward to their grandchildren—each story encouraging Readers to be a good friend, help the helpless, be willing to ask for help, and always come home.

These authors wrote a positive message into their stories while opening the world a bit wider for young Readers—demonstrating good ways to respect people who are different that “us,” how to appreciate the world (from backyard to forest) and how to handle the death of loved ones. STORY combined with beautiful, eye-appealing illustrations can deliver these theme messages while nurturing and encouraging every Reader—whatever their age or “season” of life.

Recently I was introduced to a new children’s book titled: COUNTRY ZOO by Melissa Lcountry zoo melissa brown. Brown. It is 24 pages of an encouraging story about Gretchen the Giraffe. (Who doesn’t love giraffes?) The book is listed in the genre of Juvenile Fiction which places it in the middle school to young adult category. However, I will definitely be reading it to my kindergartener. The THEME: Bullying.

You see, Gretchen was born small—and called the “runt.” Being small is a natural challenge because she can’t reach the sweetest leaves to eat or play the games the bigger giraffe’s play. As she grows, she becomes bigger than the others and faces a whole new set of problems. What happens to Gretchen?  Sorry, you’ll have to read the book for yourselves.  I will tell you, though, that you’ll fall in love with Gretchen—AND—when you review the Keep it simple, Keep it focused, Keep it moving pattern of her story you’ll have an excellent outline sample to help you develop your own story(s).

Takeaway for today: WRITE YOUR CHILDREN’S STORY THE WAY IT NEEDS TO BE TOLD and the genre category of Readers/age group will find it! The old saying that “I wish I had a nickel for” every time I’ve re-read a children’s book and found encouraging words to soothe my spirit, is often repeated in my writing workshops. Recently I added these basic themes to my list of future books to write: Encourage children to Play; to Respect others; to Listen; to Talk about their feelings; to Be a Good Example everywhere, especially at school; to Thank God every night, for everything.

If any of these topic/themes resonate with you—GO FOR IT! Write that book! Get is Published! And send me a copy! ⚓︎


Royalene

ABOUT ROYALENE DOYLE: Royalene has been writing something since before kindergarten days and continues to love the process. Through her small business—DOYLE WRITING SERVICES—she brings more than 40 years of writing experience to authors who need “just a little assistance” with completing their projects. This is a nice fit as she develops these blogs for Outskirts Press (OP) a leading self-publisher, and occasionally accepts a ghostwriting project from one of their clients. Her recent book release (with OP) titled FIREPROOF PROVERBS, A Writer’s Study of Words, is already receiving excellent reviews including several professional writer’s endorsements given on the book’s back cover.  

Royalene’s writing experience grew through a wide variety of positions from Office Manager and Administrative Assistant to Teacher of Literature and Advanced Writing courses and editor/writer for an International Christian ministry. Her willingness to listen to struggling authors, learn their goals and expectations and discern their writing voice has brought many manuscripts into the published books arena.

Conversations: 5/5/2017

LET’S PLAY!

WRITE YOUR CHILDREN’S BOOKS!

Have you ever considered writing books for children? I took a swing at it when my daughter was just starting kindergarten. The plan was to use her experiences to develop a story that would be great fun for lots of children as well as give her a book filled with many of her very own memories. As the pages fell from my typewriter—no personal PC at my house in those days—my embellishments carried her story into an imaginary realm. Although I read it to her at the time, and she laughed and became surprised at all the right spots, the manuscript never left our house. Today, I’m thinking of revising it a bit and try it out with our great-grandchildren. I’ve learned a lot over these years. What better time to share these children’s writing techniques with you than springtime when the world comes alive with blossoms and playgrounds full of children.

children's picture book

Possibly the best advice—and instruction—I received when seeking “the way” to write for children of various ages was this:

Keep it simple. Keep it focused. Keep it moving. Those were the key points given by a well-known children’s author I met at the first writer’s conference I attended. Although she was speaking specifically about writing for young children, I’ve sown those guidelines into all my writing efforts.

Keep it simple. We’ve all heard that educating our children “starts in the womb” when Mom reads aloud. And that infants and toddlers are “sponge learners” absorbing sights, sounds and language very quickly. However, if we over-write a children’s book, it will be of no use to the child/audience we’re want to reach.

  • Hold the story to a 1,200-1,500 word length.
  • Each sentence should reveal one single specific idea.
  • Use words that describe the idea—words that translate into beautiful illustrations.
  • Paragraphs: no longer than three sentences.
  • KEEP YOUR WORDS VISUAL. I’ve added this piece to my Start Here list because once an infant’s eyes begin to “track” the sounds and voices they hear their world expands dramatically.

Keep it focused. It’s all about the available “attention span” of the age group we’re writing for.

  • Picture books/Board books: full color pages with large, easily identifiable characters and illustrations, and one-to-five words per page. These stories need to be tightly written.
  • Short Story books where each page of eight to fifteen words is considered a “chapter.”
  • Longer Chapter books connect to the specific likes of kindergarten and first grade age children. Remember, the parents are still selecting these books, and if the illustrations appear too “different” to them, they will buy a different book.

Keep it moving. All great stories are built on the same essential elements: character(s), interesting setting and plot—ups and downs of some level of conflict—and the resolution. When author Margaret Wise Brown wrote a rhyming poem (1947) describing the bedtime ritual of a bunny rabbit she could not have guessed the millions of children who have enjoyed it. GOOD NIGHT MOON gave very young children the rhythm of the words which flowed with the actions of the main character resulting a peaceful night’s sleep.

Takeaway for today: whether you aim to make a career in the children’s books world, or write in ANY other genre, take the opportunity to exercise your skills and follow the above steps to create one Picture Book. Think of this as PLAY TIME and allow images to float in your thoughts as the words pour onto the page. You may just find yourself writing the next book that sells 48 billion copies. ⚓︎


Royalene

ABOUT ROYALENE DOYLE: Royalene has been writing something since before kindergarten days and continues to love the process. Through her small business—DOYLE WRITING SERVICES—she brings more than 40 years of writing experience to authors who need “just a little assistance” with completing their projects. This is a nice fit as she develops these blogs for Outskirts Press (OP) a leading self-publisher, and occasionally accepts a ghostwriting project from one of their clients. Her recent book release (with OP) titled FIREPROOF PROVERBS, A Writer’s Study of Words, is already receiving excellent reviews including several professional writer’s endorsements given on the book’s back cover.  

Royalene’s writing experience grew through a wide variety of positions from Office Manager and Administrative Assistant to Teacher of Literature and Advanced Writing courses and editor/writer for an International Christian ministry. Her willingness to listen to struggling authors, learn their goals and expectations and discern their writing voice has brought many manuscripts into the published books arena.

Conversations: 4/28/2017

BENEFITS OF WRITING SIGHT AND SOUND SCENES – Part IV

Last week I mentioned that one of my favorite places to settle-in and be inspired is the Children’s section of my local library. They have an oversized, puffy rocking chair in one corner and a beautifully carved wooden rocker at the center where various people (sometimes authors) come and read aloud to groups of children. Being in this environment offers me the opportunity to observe the child’s world of uninhibited actions and reactions—their spontaneous abandon to the sights and sounds the experience and imagine.

Researching the benefits—and detriments—of Sights and Sounds can greatly enhance the authenticity of our writing. Here are a few things I’ve learned:

SOUND…

  • Specific sounds can “re-pattern” the brain’s ability to organize time/space/spatial perceptions.
  • Since the 1990s research is building to confirm that some of Mozart’s music may also be beneficial for developing spatial intelligence.
  • Making music and listening to music that contains and repeats specific tones and “hertz” (Hz) can be excellent stress reducers.
  • Congested, loud “music” and/or sounds (TV’s, radios, computers) can be highly disruptive, and may damage the cochlea of the ear.
  • For centuries, Native Americans have utilized drumming and pipe/flute sounds to bring rest to the ill, peace to overactive children and harmony/rhythm into their families.

SIGHT…

  • In February of this year, author Steven Ingrahm self-published a book titled When Nature Speaks. I am excited to get my hands on a copy because of his clear understanding of the discovery every writer must come to in order to develop their best work. Ingrahm states, “All of a person’s [Reader’s] senses can be stimulated at the same time, when they surround themselves in nature.…[we] all live under the same stars.”
  • Cursory glances at our environment leave writers in the depths of famine especially when attempting to connect to Readers they hope will become Fans. You’ve read the words before in my blogs: DETAILS—Readers need detailed visual descriptions in order to see what you want them to see—yes, even within short stories or novellas.
  • Humans require light in order to see. As with sound there are frequencies of light (wavelengths) which give our brains information through the lenses of our eyes. Those who write in the Sci-Fi genre will benefit greatly by researching concepts space/time and “the speed of light.”
  • Most great artists will agree that the use of “white space” is also quite valuable. Researching this concept from an artists’ perspective has given me new insight into the value of what, when or IF I reveal something in my novel.

This month we’ve talked about how (1) the beauty—or harshness—of the environment we create for our characters often gives the writer the contrast needed to carry the story. (2) There is great value in reading the works of other authors—in multiple genres—or open our eyes to other perspectives and the ways they express Sight and Sound. (3) Utilizing the five senses (sight, sound, touch, taste, smell) is not enough. We must tap into the other senses of pain, balance, motion, temperature and intuition/perception.

Finally, my friends, take your daily does of vitamins and build your physical strength. BECAUSE, once you’re published, you’ll be “out there” marketing your book(s) and enjoying being discovered⚓︎

sight and sound woman with headphones


Royalene

ABOUT ROYALENE DOYLE: Royalene has been writing something since before kindergarten days and continues to love the process. Through her small business—DOYLE WRITING SERVICES—she brings more than 40 years of writing experience to authors who need “just a little assistance” with completing their projects. This is a nice fit as she develops these blogs for Outskirts Press (OP) a leading self-publisher, and occasionally accepts a ghostwriting project from one of their clients. Her recent book release (with OP) titled FIREPROOF PROVERBS, A Writer’s Study of Words, is already receiving excellent reviews including several professional writer’s endorsements given on the book’s back cover.  

Royalene’s writing experience grew through a wide variety of positions from Office Manager and Administrative Assistant to Teacher of Literature and Advanced Writing courses and editor/writer for an International Christian ministry. Her willingness to listen to struggling authors, learn their goals and expectations and discern their writing voice has brought many manuscripts into the published books arena.

Conversations: 4/21/2017

BENEFITS OF WRITING SIGHT AND SOUND SCENES – Part III

One of the methods I use to kick-start my writing involves taking a walk through our local library and looking for Picture/Photo books. Not only do the beautiful scenic photos inspire me, but the details fill me with “What if?” questions—which, in turn, push me right back into writing. Sometimes I am captured by exquisite coffee-table-books that are strategically placed throughout the library; those oversized, thicker photo-pages with captions that identify the country, state, mountain range or desert location of the images. Other times I settle at a table in the History section or cozy into the big rocking chair in the Children’s section. Following are a few examples of these types of books and how to discover your own treasures in their midst.

home of the bluesHome of the Blues by Debby Wallace and Daniel Coston is written from the perspective
of “IF the walls could talk.” These two authors (Debby a retired RN now freelance writer and Daniel an established photographer for magazines and CD covers) have done their research and reconnected the world with sounds of the past created in a place that continues to inspire us today.

If you are writing a “period piece” set in 1900s America, you’ll benefit from reading these pages and walking into the images of “The Days of the Blues.”

For sheer scenic imagery check out the books of photographer William A. Carlson: FROM DELICATE LILY PADS TO SCULPTURED from delicate lily pads to sculptured peaks by william a carlsonPEAKS: Landscape Photography with Verse Impressions from North America, Scandinavia, and New Zealand…or his second book of photography, IMPRESSIONS OF NATURE IN BLACK AND WHITE. Carlson’s work has captured the positive attention of American Landscape Photographer, John Fielder, which led me to begin turning the pages. Earlier I mentioned the value of details and these images gave me just that—the ability to imagine myself standing in these environments and experiencing my own “sensory responses” that are mentioned in his verses.

For those of us who utilize setting almost to the point of creating the places as additional characters in our stories, this genre of Nature/Scenic photography can be most useful. When we cannot be there ourselves, we can still have the opportunity to meld with such photos and imagine the prick of pine needles dropped from majestic, towering pine forests.

FROM these two basic genre/types of published works we can be inspired to:

  • Create a historic and/or seasonal location that meets the needs of our storyline.
  • Develop a fluid time—morning, afternoon, evening, “dark of night.”
  • Set the weather patterns that effect our characters.
  • Utilize each of the five senses: sight, sound, touch, taste and smell.

But don’t forget the sixth sense and the additional four (at least) senses that every one of your Readers will engage as they turn the pages of your book(s). They are mostly physical senses and include:

  • Pain: from physical, emotional, psychological injury.
  • Balance: the equilibrium that keeps us standing on our feet or seated comfortably in our chairs.
  • Motion: the active use of joints in our bodies that move our “parts.”
  • Temperature: the body’s sensitivity to internal and external temperatures.
  • The Intuitive or perceptive is what most call “the sixth sense.” However, many scientists today believe it is just as much a part of the human sensory system as the others.

Steeping ourselves in Sight and Sound environments, whether joining Outward Bound trail blazers or sitting comfortably at home, in a library or neighborhood park will enhance our writing skills. My writing always benefits when I take the time to build my memory bank (and files) with such images. I hope you will, too. ⚓︎


Royalene

ABOUT ROYALENE DOYLE: Royalene has been writing something since before kindergarten days and continues to love the process. Through her small business—DOYLE WRITING SERVICES—she brings more than 40 years of writing experience to authors who need “just a little assistance” with completing their projects. This is a nice fit as she develops these blogs for Outskirts Press (OP) a leading self-publisher, and occasionally accepts a ghostwriting project from one of their clients. Her recent book release (with OP) titled FIREPROOF PROVERBS, A Writer’s Study of Words, is already receiving excellent reviews including several professional writer’s endorsements given on the book’s back cover.  

Royalene’s writing experience grew through a wide variety of positions from Office Manager and Administrative Assistant to Teacher of Literature and Advanced Writing courses and editor/writer for an International Christian ministry. Her willingness to listen to struggling authors, learn their goals and expectations and discern their writing voice has brought many manuscripts into the published books arena.

Conversations: 4/14/2017

BENEFITS OF WRITING SIGHT AND SOUND SCENES – Part II

As mentioned last week, today’s Readers are addicted to the visual and sound effects offered to them in every part of their lives. However we know that there is nothing to match the human imagination as we read the words of a novel that create our own sight and sound experience.

With that in mind, I will mention one other book which my students selected for class discussion from the World Literature list: The Call of the Wild by Jack London. I’m sure they expected this to be a “quick and easy” grade because it is short and most had read it before. I won’t add their classroom experience here, but only say that they got more out of it than expected. However, now that working with writers of various levels of experience, I’ll share several concepts about Mr. London and his writing expertise that can benefit us, today.

  • London’s stories take the reader out of their comfort zone and force them to imagine, “What if.” Yes, the main character is Buck, the dog. Yet this character symbolizes a common mythic character who wins the day against all odds and returns to the peaceful bliss of nature. Did London develop this thread from reading such novels as Dickens’ Hard Times? Possibly. And it is alive and well today in the multi-media (magazine, book, film) super-hero productions.
  • This novel falls into the genre of “animal fiction.” However its blend of parable, fable and allegory is another reason it has never been out of print since first published in 1903. These three genre categories are excellent venues within which to practice and develop writing skills.
  • Finally, the bold content that almost forces Readers to feel the “flight or fight” adrenalin effect was part of London’s strategy to make a statement against what he saw as the destructive result of industrialization. His personal life experiences “in the wild” touched him deeply and he hoped others could appreciate its inspiration, beauty and value.

Most of us write and develop our novels to accomplish these same goals: offer examples of survival against all odds, inspire Readers toward happier, healthier lifestyles and (this is the BIG goal) never be out of print.

Now…keeping London’s Call of the Wild in mind—and the beauty of sights and sounds he experienced—consider the following book as a potential tool to inspire and develop your own creativity.

art experience and faith by william tolliver squireArt, Experience and Faith by William Tolliver Squires, a retired Art professor at the
University of Georgia and a current sculptor and painter, has been called a “guidebook of one artist’s evolving theory of his creative process.”  “Dr. Squires describes his early artistic career as…misdirected, without grounding in a mature sense of what is important in life and art. He now sees the best work of his life as…how the process is informed by a combination of his intuitive, spiritual self and his practical, rational self.”

I find it totally joyful when discovering additional ways to enhance my writing. It is even more exciting to share these tools with other writers! No matter what season we are in, or what genre we’ve chosen, ALL the tools to develop writing skills will help us produce the best book possible. Once that manuscript is completed then it’s time to publish! GO FOR IT! You’ll never regret it. ⚓︎


Royalene

ABOUT ROYALENE DOYLE: Royalene has been writing something since before kindergarten days and continues to love the process. Through her small business—DOYLE WRITING SERVICES—she brings more than 40 years of writing experience to authors who need “just a little assistance” with completing their projects. This is a nice fit as she develops these blogs for Outskirts Press (OP) a leading self-publisher, and occasionally accepts a ghostwriting project from one of their clients. Her recent book release (with OP) titled FIREPROOF PROVERBS, A Writer’s Study of Words, is already receiving excellent reviews including several professional writer’s endorsements given on the book’s back cover.  

Royalene’s writing experience grew through a wide variety of positions from Office Manager and Administrative Assistant to Teacher of Literature and Advanced Writing courses and editor/writer for an International Christian ministry. Her willingness to listen to struggling authors, learn their goals and expectations and discern their writing voice has brought many manuscripts into the published books arena.

Conversations: 4/7/2017

BENEFITS OF WRITING SIGHT AND SOUND SCENES

Have you found your perfect writing environment? Is it a room with bookshelves on three walls, a comfy reading chair in one corner and your computer desk in the other? Does the remaining wall hold a wide bay window, or French doors that open to your expansive tree-shaded yard? OR is your writing space the laundry folding table in the basement next to the washer and dryer?

Wherever your creative writing location might be, and whatever sights and sounds you may be dealing with as you develop your books, this month I will encourage you to allow your imagination the freedom to send exquisite sights and sounds to your Readers. Each new generation of scientific research proves validity of what authors known for centuries: Readers need to see and hear in order to feel what our characters are experiencing. When they do, they will buy—and keep buying—our books.

When I was teaching high school students World Literature and Advanced Writing, they taught me a lot about the value of communication because their “world” is now ninety percent (or more) visually enhanced soundtracks. So when I requested they read Hard Times by Charles Dickens they’d already heard the opinions of other students and the groans cascaded around the room. The “reading” assignment I gave them surprised even me: draw me a picture or create a cut-out collage of what you’re seeing and hearing about these characters lives.

Dickens wrote extensive descriptive paragraphs depicting a grim and grey town suffocated by industrial industries yet filled with the tapestry of Victorian daily life. The students met the challenge and became more aware of the life some of their ancestors survived. Will they be fans of Charles Dickens? Probably not. However, they will appreciate the view he gave them.

african SavannahTo balance their reading assignments a later assignment was Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton. Here we are exposed to the sights and sounds of South Africa and the visual and palpable story of a Zula father’s search for his children. Often the beauty—or harshness—of the environment gives the author the contrast needed to carry the story.

Here are my first three tips to enhance or begin building your descriptive writing skills:

  • THINK MOVIE. Go to the library or your video collection or “on demand” selections on your TV and watch several movies that relate to the genre you’re writing. TAKE NOTES of the sights and sounds that effect and affect you.
  • OBSERVE the details as if you’re looking through a camera lens. Ask yourself “Why” the director focused on that/those images—then write out your answer.
  • LISTEN to the soundtrack. Replay the movie and close your eyes (or turn away from the screen) as you block out as much of the dialogue as possible and discover the sounds of this story. Be as descriptive as you can in explain (make notes about) what you’re hearing. If a separate soundtrack has been produced you can usually find that through libraries.

There are times I envy authors who lived and wrote their books in the 1800s or 1900s. Then I sit down at my computer, in my 10×10 “office” that I share with my husband, and open a narrow window to listen to birds and dogs and wind and the occasional neighborly conversation three floors below. This is my season to write—my heartbeat on the world’s timeline—and I want to offer my best writing skills to Readers of today and future generations. I hope that is your goal, too. Let’s enjoy this journey together. ⚓︎


Royalene

ABOUT ROYALENE DOYLE: Royalene has been writing something since before kindergarten days and continues to love the process. Through her small business—DOYLE WRITING SERVICES—she brings more than 40 years of writing experience to authors who need “just a little assistance” with completing their projects. This is a nice fit as she develops these blogs for Outskirts Press (OP) a leading self-publisher, and occasionally accepts a ghostwriting project from one of their clients. Her recent book release (with OP) titled FIREPROOF PROVERBS, A Writer’s Study of Words, is already receiving excellent reviews including several professional writer’s endorsements given on the book’s back cover.  

Royalene’s writing experience grew through a wide variety of positions from Office Manager and Administrative Assistant to Teacher of Literature and Advanced Writing courses and editor/writer for an International Christian ministry. Her willingness to listen to struggling authors, learn their goals and expectations and discern their writing voice has brought many manuscripts into the published books arena.