Self-Publishing News: 9.11.2017 – The Interviews!

september

And now for the news!

Some highlights from this month in the world of self-publishing, specifically interviews with or articles written by self-publishing authors and experts!

Early this month, this article by Kathy Boccella went live on The Philadelphia Inquirer‘s website, and we haven’t stopped thinking about it since. Here, Boccella tracks the evolution of one teen’s quest to become self-published–and who, at 13, has already accomplished that particular dream. Blogger, founder of both  and GenZInsider.com, and now an author, Sky Rota is quite the force of nature. Says Boccella, “It’s hard to imagine how he found the time among maintaining his Gen Z website;  filming videos of exotic cars, a hobby since he was 8; and advising clients such as an online handbag seller on e-commerce and an app developer trying to reach teen customers”–but as she goes on to show, he does, and he does so with insight and dedication, two qualities he brings to every aspect of his life, including his publishing. Rota is the author of The Gen Z Answer Key for Business, which he self-published earlier this year in the hopes of spreading his ideas as an inventor to a new generation. Rota has also, for better or worse, become something of a spokesperson for disability rights in this country: As recently as last year, he and his family went up against the school which expelled him in a landmark legal case. Says Boccella, “their high-profile loss in the courtroom is part of a much bigger narrative about how a child who has struggled with conventional reading and writing can also — aided by 21st- century technology — find outlets for his energy and ideas.” Luckily, the closure of that case has done nothing to dampen Rota’s desire to advocate for others in and outside of the classroom. Of one thing you can be sure: we’ll be watching with eager interest as he continues to self-publish!

Not only can self-publishing provide a way forward for authors emerging from times of disappointment, as with Sky Rota, but it can also be a healing process in and of itself. This is the case with Brocton mother Michelle Marsh, author of a new self-published novel called Hidden Scars. In this piece published on the Enterprise website, contributor Marc Larocque tracks Marsh’s progress through the 13-year process which led to the book’s publication, a process which included marriage, children, and–here’s the hardest part–divorce. As Larocque records, Marsh found her feet in the act of writing: “To me,” says Marsh, “it was time to start a new chapter, and it was time to start something new [….] I started and I did not want to stop. Once I got off Facebook, I got into my own world, and really just got into my characters. I just wrote.” And we’re glad she did; Hidden Scars not only promises to be a fine novel, but it also launches a series of books. “My readers are waiting patiently for the sequel,” says Marsh. And they are … including us!

If you thought dancing was just a stay-at-home activity, boy, does author and dancer Mike Gomborone have some news for you! Gomborone, as the Batavia Daily News contributor Mallory Diefenbach reports last week, “has seen the world”–and all because of dance. He spent his high school years doing plays, then spent nine years on cruise ships honing his skills as a performer, and now he’s ready to talk about it: in February, Gomborone released his memoirs as a collection of 75 essays, a book called Singing My Way Around the World: An Entertainer’s Life at Sea. And as Diefenbach writes, it’s not your typical memoir: “Each of the essays he wrote turned into a chapter in the book, accompanied by a hand-drawn map of where it took place.” With such an experimental format, perhaps it’s no surprise that Gomborone would turn to self-publishing, which has always been friendlier to mixing visual art with the written word than the establishment. But then, Gomborone’s life hasn’t taken the ordinary path, either. Diefenbach writes that the entertainer has had to perform in some truly unusual–even frightening–circumstances. “We were from Japan and Hawaii and we had one day that was almost unbearable,” says Gomborone. “You couldn’t walk anywhere. You basically had to lie down and that was pretty scary.” But as performers the world over have gone on to say, the show must go on–and we’re incredibly excited that Gomborone’s experiences are now accessible to us thanks to the world of self-publishing!


spa-news

As a self-publishing author, you may find it helpful to stay up-to-date on the trends and news related to the self-publishing industry.This will help you make informed decisions before, during and after the self-publishing process, which will lead to a greater self-publishing experience. To help you stay current on self-publishing topics, simply visit our blog every Monday to find out the hottest news. If you have other big news to share, please comment below.

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Self-Publishing News: 8.14.2017

Hello august. Splash paint letters

And now for the news!

Some highlights from this month in the world of self-publishing, specifically interviews with or articles written by self-publishing authors and experts!

“Today’s generation can easily upload and publish a book for free online,” writes Vanessa Garcia in this July 15 article for the Amarillo Globe-News: “But with so many potential authors, those who choose to self-publish face the challenge of standing out from the ever-growing online crowd.” So, how does one go about doing just that? Garcia elaborates on the experiences of several key self-publishing authors in the Amarillo area, including Ryan McSwain (who is, according to the article, preparing to self-publish his second book, “Four Color Bleed,” on Amazon) and Tracy Schamburg (whose latest book, “The Common Sense Guide to Landing on Your Feet,” has recently been self-published). McSwain touts the importance of good copy editing and presentation–being “error-free”–in making a book marketable, while Schamburg agrees and recommends seeking out a support network of experienced and skilled teammates … such as an editor. Both authors and Garcia have a lot to say about the process of going indie, and the article is well worth a look. You can find it at the link!

In this article, posted to the Latin-American Herald-Tribune, readers are introduced to Argentinian self-publishing author, Susana Oro. “One of Argentina’s most prolific writers in the romance-novel genre,” Oro reputedly “touted the advantages of self-publishing platforms, saying they allow for greater creative freedom and enable authors to establish their own rhythm of production.” If you happen to be a reader of Spanish genre fiction, this is one author to watch, as Oro has already published 12 novels, and puts out an average of three to four a year–a trend which she attributes entirely to the rapidity and responsiveness of indie publishing. She has no illusions about traditional publishing, saying that unless a person was to write Fifty Shades of Grey, “the big companies are unlikely to take an author seriously and promote their work sufficiently to allow them to make a living from literature.” You can read the full article on the Latin-American Herald Tribune website.

This August 13 News & Advance article by Casey Gillis spotlights the work of Ron Sisson, author of the children’s books Lost on Big Otter River and Stalk Eyes, each of which features engaging characters and places a premium on a sense of place. Sisson, now 82, has a background in a very different kind of writing. Says Gillis, “As a draftsman and, later, engineer with General Electric, he worked in research and development in New York before transferring to Lynchburg in 1972, where he joined the bids and proposals and project management department.” The fit was a natural one, according to Sisson.  Lost on Big Otter River, his first book, “was inspired by a boating trip he took with two of his three children near Lynchburg in 1976. Geared toward kids ages 9 to 12, the creative nonfiction tale came out in 2015.” Stalk Eyes, his second book, was published more recently.

What follows is a lengthy interview between Gillis and Sisson, touching on all aspects of his experience in self-publishing these two works, and well worth your time if you too are considering going indie with your next children’s book. The News & Advance, which covers Lynchburg, Virginia as well as Amherst, Appomattox, Bedford and Campbell counties, makes for a happy home for this article, which you can read here.

You can find all of these authors’ excellent books for sale online.


spa-news

As a self-publishing author, you may find it helpful to stay up-to-date on the trends and news related to the self-publishing industry.This will help you make informed decisions before, during and after the self-publishing process, which will lead to a greater self-publishing experience. To help you stay current on self-publishing topics, simply visit our blog every Monday to find out the hottest news. If you have other big news to share, please comment below.
Kelly
ABOUT KELLY SCHUKNECHT: Kelly Schuknecht is the Executive Vice President of Outskirts Press. In addition to her contributions to the Outskirts Press blog at blog.outskirtspress.com, Kelly and a group of talented marketing experts offer book marketing services, support, and products to not only published Outskirts Press authors, but to all authors and professionals who are interested in marketing their books and/or careers. Learn more about Kelly on her blog, kellyschuknecht.com

Self-Publishing News: 7.10.2017

And now for the news!

Some highlights from this month in the world of self-publishing, specifically interviews with or articles written by self-publishing authors and experts!

Every now and again, an interview comes along which we just can’t ignore, and this July 9 article on Rolling Out by Yvette Caslin is one of those. Its opening tells you a lot of what the interview has in store:

“I love being able to call my own shots with my writing and publishing. The creative freedom is something you can only find when you are an entrepreneur,” offers Carlos Harleaux when asked why he wants to be an entrepreneur.

And a spirit of entrepreneurship, independence, and creative freedom is at the heart of what Harleaux is all about. His latest book, No Cream in the Middle, is a follow-up novel to the popular self-published book, Fortune Cookie. He answers questions about the more difficult aspects of publishing, about how he came to be an author, and how new authors can break into a packed market. You can find the full text of the interview at the link!

Author John Marrs pulls no punches in this piece for the UK’s Express. He was, like many authors who eventually pursue self-publication, under the impression that working with a traditional publishing house to find his book a home would be a relatively straightforward process. Says Marrs, “I assumed that with more than 20 years as a journalist behind me, writing for national magazines and newspapers, I might have had a slight advantage over other new writers on the hunt for an agent. How naive I was,” he concludes.

The path was not an easy one. He queried 80 publishing houses––and the results were less than enthusiastic. “The first few rejection letters trickled through the letterbox within seven days,” says Marrs. “More came within a fortnight and by the end of the month, my hope of becoming the next publishing success story deflated like the slow puncture of a tyre. Over the next four months, the rest of the rebuffs appeared in dribs and drabs.”

We’ve all been there. But what’s great about Marrs’ story is that he didn’t stay there. He found a different way forward. And he’s not alone: according to Marrs and a study put out by by Author Earnings, “42 per cent of all books now downloaded are by indie writers, many of whom, like me, have been rejected by agents.” Marrs has ideas on why this isn’t, in the end, such a bad thing––and much, much more to chew on. You can find the rest of his article here.

Can they? Can they really?

It’s easy to fall into the trap of thinking there’s only one right way to do ‘publishing.’ After all, traditional publishing houses and the agents who work with them have a vested interest in perpetuating the myth of blockbuster success. And self-publishing companies, too––let’s be honest, here––drum up a little business by touting self-publishing as the one feasible, one easy alternative.

So who do we believe?

Here’s a thought: Let’s believe the authors. And authors like Savi Sharma have plenty of ideas about the future of publishing, and possible routes through the swamp of options. Sharma, whose breakout hit Everyone Has a Story debuted in 2015, may be young but she has, now, plenty of publishing experience. She says, “In the past years, people used to say self-publishing is a bad choice, as you can’t sell more books through it. But today, it’s a great opportunity. You can sell books if you know how to go through the entire process. But yes, you need to learn many things like how to connect with the audience, etc. If you do it effectively, you can be successful.” For the full interview, visit Financial Express online.

You can find all of these authors’ excellent books for sale online.


spa-news

As a self-publishing author, you may find it helpful to stay up-to-date on the trends and news related to the self-publishing industry.This will help you make informed decisions before, during and after the self-publishing process, which will lead to a greater self-publishing experience. To help you stay current on self-publishing topics, simply visit our blog every Monday to find out the hottest news. If you have other big news to share, please comment below.
Kelly
ABOUT KELLY SCHUKNECHT: Kelly Schuknecht is the Executive Vice President of Outskirts Press. In addition to her contributions to the Outskirts Press blog at blog.outskirtspress.com, Kelly and a group of talented marketing experts offer book marketing services, support, and products to not only published Outskirts Press authors, but to all authors and professionals who are interested in marketing their books and/or careers. Learn more about Kelly on her blog, kellyschuknecht.com.

Radio Market Tip for the Self-Published Author

Lately I’ve been discussing radio interviews for the self-published author. I hope you’ve found these tips helpful. On-air interviews are one of the staples of a good self-published book publicity campaign. Here’s one more tip to help you get started.

It probably comes as no surprise to you that New York is the largest radio market in the United States. But who is number 2? Or number 22? By understanding market size, you can better prioritize your on-air marketing efforts.

The link below will take you to lists of US Radio market size organized by size and also organized alphabetically by market name.

www.radio-media.com/markets

Good luck and have fun!

Kelly Schuknecht
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