In Your Corner: Put Your Vacation to Work!

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Oh, I know–turning a vacation into a working vacation isn’t necessarily what you had in mind for your summer, but the fact remains: books aren’t going to sell themselves, and when it comes to being an indie author, there’s not a moment to be wasted.

Even … vacation hours.

Maybe even especially vacation hours!

Luckily for everyone, there are some easy ways to boost your sales and make your vacations work for you rather than against your book sales!

Vacations and the reunions that go with them can be the absolutely most ideal time to market your book and gather some new readers. Or maybe old readers. Age doesn’t matter. Everybody reads, especially when they have a personal connection to the author–you! Reunions are a fantastic place to tell family members, friends, and other personal connections about your book and where they can buy it.

Then there’s the most magical of all summer vacation destinations: the gift shop, the ultimate place to display and present your book for shoppers and readers on their various road trips. And while you travel, too–any stranger you meet on a trip is only a stranger until you break the ice by sharing your book!

Of course, if you’re going to make the most of your vacation, there are some things to keep in mind. You’ll need to:

Keep up with your social media.

Before you take off for the beach of the mountains, schedule. Schedule, schedule, schedule. Facebook has a lovely, easy tool built-in to make this possible–simply put your posts together, and click the drop-down arrow next to the ‘post’ button and input the date and time of your intended schedule.

But what about the others? There are quite a few tools out there to manage all of your media at once. Hootsuite is one, Later.com another, Buffer yet a third. Do your due diligence and pick a service that fits your needs, and be aware that there are free options, so you should theoretically be able to take care of your scheduling needs affordably. Once you have an account, all you have to do is preload your tweets, your posts to Google+ and Instagram and so on.

And of course, be safe! Play up your travels as much as you like as a kind of promotion, but don’t make a point of mentioning how long you’ll be away from home, or other personal details that the disingenuous might exploit. Take pictures and make plenty of memories to share later!

Network!

Take full advantage of your trip to plan for the future. Is there a writing conference taking place in one of your destination cities? Get on the list. Are there book readings? Could you plan a book reading at one of the libraries near your beach or mountain idyll? Local writing groups are another great option. Plenty of people might be interested in having you speak about the process of self-publishing.

And of course, come prepared. Keep a pack of business cards, bookmarks, postcards, posters, and a couple of promotional copies of your book on hand, and practice your elevator pitch thoroughly before hand. If you haven’t yet invested in some merch, go ahead and start down that glorious road. Think outside the box, too: is there a way to promote a giveaway while traveling, guerrilla style?

Make it a GRAND tour!

Some of the items on your agenda are a given, no matter what kind of vacation we’re talking about. But it’s well worth your effort to look into the libraries, museums, gift shops, bookstores, civic spaces, and other places that might serve as a spot for a reading, signing, or other promotional event. If your book somehow relates to local history or events—even better! Marketing your self-published book shouldn’t take up all of your precious vacation time, but spending even just a handful of minutes each day checking Twitter or arranging a couple of book readings will help support the marketing and sales momentum you’ve worked so hard to build–not to mention pay for an even better vacation next year!

You are not alone. ♣︎


Elizabeth

ABOUT ELIZABETH JAVOR: With over 18 years of experience in sales and management, Elizabeth Javor works as the Manager of Author Services for Outskirts Press. The Author Services Department is composed of knowledgeable publishing consultants, pre-production specialists, customer service reps and book marketing specialists; together, they all focus on educating authors on the self-publishing process to help them publish the book of their dreams. Whether you are a professional looking to take your career to the next level with platform-driven non-fiction or a novelist seeking fame, fortune, and/or personal fulfillment, Elizabeth Javor can put you on the right path.

Easy Breezy Summer Publishing (Part 2)

Last week, I launched a new summer series on self-publishing, particularly as regards publishing and marketing your book during this busy time of year–and how to take advantage of our July theme of freedoms and independence while doing so!

Today, I want to talk about the flip side of freedom.

You might call it … UNFREEDOM*.

(*After all, there has to be some sort of language to describe the opposite of ‘freedom’ which isn’t problematically tied to this nation’s long and deeply troubling relationship to captivities of various kinds … right? I’ll make the attempt, while recognizing and honoring the tight spot into which the English language … and the history of American expansion … has put me. Here goes!)

Point: Self-publishing authors are constrained by their circumstances, and therefore limited as marketers of their works. Let’s slow down and look at some of the speed bumps in our way!

independence, bird

Time.

The first constraint you’re likely to hear about when talking with self-publishing authors about their marketing attempts is how difficult it is to find the time to market well! After all, most indie authors aren’t living lives of leisure; they’re working, sometimes multiple jobs, to pay the rent and bring in the groceries. They usually have families; often, young kids and sleepless nights are also on order. In this kind of typical environment, it’s hard enough to find time to sleep much less write much less market your books for sale to the general public! And this problem also often inspires a great deal of self-doubt and frustration, as the marketing goes on.

Why don’t people just buy my book already? Hint: if it were that easy to sell books, traditional publishing houses wouldn’t have dedicated marketing staff, either! As a self-publishing author, you’ve written and signed a contract with yourself to do whatever it takes to become a published author … and that includes signing away a large chunk of your time.

Suggestion #1: Protect your time by slowing down long enough to sort out your priorities, and set a schedule that is both ambitious … and attainable.

Money.

Here’s the other big speed bump, right? If you don’t have the time, energy, skills, or access to do what needs doing in order to market your book, you’re going to have to fork over some cash to make it happen! Of course, how much you spend is going to vary greatly depending on what path you take towards publication; vanity presses often tout their marketing successes, but often prove disappointing in results anyway, and the really good self-publishing companies–with dependable, expert staff who’ve been in the business long enough to give you a really good leg up–cost a pretty penny.

Spending some money is unavoidable. Breaking the bank … is.

Suggestion #2: Guard yourself against both amazement and disappointment by doing your research ahead of time. Don’t trust a company’s own press releases for your data, either! Do your due diligence and check out customer reviews, and as with my suggestion for time, go ahead and slow down long enough to plot out what services you can take care of effectively on your own … and which ones you really need help with!

Energy.

Alright–it’s time to take a deep breath and feel your body for a moment. Are you sitting in a chair? Criss-cross-applesauce on the hardwood floor? Hanging from the rafters? Are you comfortable? Are you feeling … a little … sleepy?

We’ve mentioned this every now and again on SPA, but it’s always worth mentioning again: a person doesn’t wake up each morning with endless energy! Energy is a budgeted resource, and your body has no qualms about letting you know when you’re close to running the tank totally dry. Like, right now, my eyes are burning from having worn contacts all day, my knees are aching from walking in to work, and I can’t stop yawning no matter how hard I try–all of which are signs that I’m about a half hour from keeping the neighbors up with my zzzzs.

As a self-publishing author, you need to pay close attention to your energy level: it comes at a premium, and just like time, once it’s spent you’re done. There’s no writing when tired, and even coffee will only get you so far. Sleep, my friends, is inevitable!

Suggestion #3: Build some select mindfulness-based practices into your daily writing routine. Check in with your body when you sit down in your chair. Are you actually feeling good and comfortable–and energetic? If your body is screaming “NO MORE! I CHANGED THIRTY DIAPERS TODAY!” then it may be time to back off, allow yourself to get some sleep, eat the right kind of meal, and do a thing which brings you joy. Make a promise to yourself to come back the next day in a better frame of mind and body, and I guarantee you’ll produce better work–work you can be proud of!

Skills.

Look … we’re not all born with a Wacom tablet or a Master of Business in our hands! It’s okay if you don’t know how to set up social media accounts … THIRTY DIFFERENT WAYS … or how to design your own book cover, including blurb, ISBN, LOC numbers, and so on and so forth.

Knowing what your skill set is, and how best to take advantage of what you already know how to do, is absolutely imperative! So, too, is knowing where your skill set runs out, and therefore when you ought to turn to established and verifiable experts–such as those employed at various self-publishing companies, or working on a freelance basis.

Suggestion #4: Before you sit down to submit your book for publication, sit down and sketch out all of the different little processes which go into making a book, from start to finish. EVERY SINGLE ONE. (There ought to be at least thirty!) Only then can you come back and say–“Ah, yes, I can easily take care of those, but not anything to do with Goodreads giveways or writing a press release!” Listing everything will feed straight back into allocating where you spend your time, money, and energy … so make sure you get it right before the wheels are in motion and momentum is pulling you in another direction!

Access.

Last but certainly not least, one of the most oft-mentioned barriers to self-publishing–an unfreedom–is the strictures placed upon indie authors by those with the knowledge and access to make things happen. Indie authors are often left out in the cold, with no recourse but to generate their own networks and influences from scratch … which, yes, can work but often doesn’t. Meanwhile, traditional publishing houses–who have, by the way, refused to evolve to fit the changed world around their signature markets!–snigger behind their hands and offer little or no help at all … because, I assume, they don’t want the competition.

Oh, if only you could imagine all the wonderful ways we might help each other!

But what a pipe dream. Traditional publishing houses have good reasons (from a business point of view) to try and uphold their monopolies by restricting access and denying support to indie authors looking to break out. I’m talking about everything from email lists of potential customers who they hold in reserve, contracts denying their authors from collaborating with self-publishing authors, and so on.

Access is a big problem for indie authors. If you don’t know who to get in touch with to get this certain thing done, it doesn’t get done.

Suggestion #5: Don’t despair. As I’ve mentioned, some authors have made it! There are some existing networks and resources in place to help you … but just don’t expect to find easy access to knowledge and the means to act upon that knowledge within more “mainstream” or “traditional” circles. I mean, take us for example. We’re here for you–every week!


Thank you for reading!  If you have any questions, comments, suggestions, or contributions, please use the comment field below or drop us a line at selfpublishingadvice@gmail.com.  And remember to check back each Wednesday for your weekly dose of marketing musings from one indie, hybrid, and self-published author to another. ♠


Kelly

ABOUT KELLY SCHUKNECHT: Kelly Schuknecht is the Executive Vice President of Outskirts Press. In addition to her contributions to the Outskirts Press blog at blog.outskirtspress.com, Kelly and a group of talented marketing experts offer book marketing services, support, and products to not only published Outskirts Press authors, but to all authors and professionals who are interested in marketing their books and/or careers. Learn more about Kelly on her blog, kellyschuknecht.com

Self-Publishing News: 7.10.2017

And now for the news!

Some highlights from this month in the world of self-publishing, specifically interviews with or articles written by self-publishing authors and experts!

Every now and again, an interview comes along which we just can’t ignore, and this July 9 article on Rolling Out by Yvette Caslin is one of those. Its opening tells you a lot of what the interview has in store:

“I love being able to call my own shots with my writing and publishing. The creative freedom is something you can only find when you are an entrepreneur,” offers Carlos Harleaux when asked why he wants to be an entrepreneur.

And a spirit of entrepreneurship, independence, and creative freedom is at the heart of what Harleaux is all about. His latest book, No Cream in the Middle, is a follow-up novel to the popular self-published book, Fortune Cookie. He answers questions about the more difficult aspects of publishing, about how he came to be an author, and how new authors can break into a packed market. You can find the full text of the interview at the link!

Author John Marrs pulls no punches in this piece for the UK’s Express. He was, like many authors who eventually pursue self-publication, under the impression that working with a traditional publishing house to find his book a home would be a relatively straightforward process. Says Marrs, “I assumed that with more than 20 years as a journalist behind me, writing for national magazines and newspapers, I might have had a slight advantage over other new writers on the hunt for an agent. How naive I was,” he concludes.

The path was not an easy one. He queried 80 publishing houses––and the results were less than enthusiastic. “The first few rejection letters trickled through the letterbox within seven days,” says Marrs. “More came within a fortnight and by the end of the month, my hope of becoming the next publishing success story deflated like the slow puncture of a tyre. Over the next four months, the rest of the rebuffs appeared in dribs and drabs.”

We’ve all been there. But what’s great about Marrs’ story is that he didn’t stay there. He found a different way forward. And he’s not alone: according to Marrs and a study put out by by Author Earnings, “42 per cent of all books now downloaded are by indie writers, many of whom, like me, have been rejected by agents.” Marrs has ideas on why this isn’t, in the end, such a bad thing––and much, much more to chew on. You can find the rest of his article here.

Can they? Can they really?

It’s easy to fall into the trap of thinking there’s only one right way to do ‘publishing.’ After all, traditional publishing houses and the agents who work with them have a vested interest in perpetuating the myth of blockbuster success. And self-publishing companies, too––let’s be honest, here––drum up a little business by touting self-publishing as the one feasible, one easy alternative.

So who do we believe?

Here’s a thought: Let’s believe the authors. And authors like Savi Sharma have plenty of ideas about the future of publishing, and possible routes through the swamp of options. Sharma, whose breakout hit Everyone Has a Story debuted in 2015, may be young but she has, now, plenty of publishing experience. She says, “In the past years, people used to say self-publishing is a bad choice, as you can’t sell more books through it. But today, it’s a great opportunity. You can sell books if you know how to go through the entire process. But yes, you need to learn many things like how to connect with the audience, etc. If you do it effectively, you can be successful.” For the full interview, visit Financial Express online.

You can find all of these authors’ excellent books for sale online.


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As a self-publishing author, you may find it helpful to stay up-to-date on the trends and news related to the self-publishing industry.This will help you make informed decisions before, during and after the self-publishing process, which will lead to a greater self-publishing experience. To help you stay current on self-publishing topics, simply visit our blog every Monday to find out the hottest news. If you have other big news to share, please comment below.
Kelly
ABOUT KELLY SCHUKNECHT: Kelly Schuknecht is the Executive Vice President of Outskirts Press. In addition to her contributions to the Outskirts Press blog at blog.outskirtspress.com, Kelly and a group of talented marketing experts offer book marketing services, support, and products to not only published Outskirts Press authors, but to all authors and professionals who are interested in marketing their books and/or careers. Learn more about Kelly on her blog, kellyschuknecht.com.

Saturday Book Review: “Spiffy Kids Storybook of Feelings Collection”

Book reviews are a great way for self-publishing authors to gain exposure. After all, how can someone buy your book if he or she doesn’t know it exists? Paired with other elements of your book promotion strategy, requesting reviews is a great way to get people talking about what you’ve written.

When we read good reviews, we definitely like to share them. It gives the author a few (permanent) moments of fame and allows us to let the community know about a great book. Here’s this week’s book review, courtesy of Deal Sharing Aunt:

Spiffy Kids Storybook of Feelings

Spiffy Kids Storybook of Feelings Collection

by J.R. Robinson

Publisher: Outskirts Press

ISBN: 9780578164960

Synopsis*:

Meet your feelings! Spiffy Kids are the crazy, fun-loving characters that stay by your side every moment of your day-they’re those wonderful things we call feelings. So whether it’s Mad, Happy, Sad, Shy, Worry, or any of the many other Spiffy Kids, at least one is always with you-even right now! This clever little book describes a child’s various emotions in a fun and entertaining way, with bright illustrations and lots of humor. It also gives children ways of dealing with these feelings and lets them know they are not alone. Everyone struggles with being mad, having worry, and sadness, and everyone has moments of being happy. Spiffy Kids is a must-have for any child’s library! The Spiffy Kids were created by a seven-year-old girl who grew up with an important rule of thumb: Never completely lose what it is like to be a child. By using her imagination, she came up with a way to express herself, giving rise to fun characters that children can relate to.

 * courtesy of Amazon.com

Critique:

I really liked this book! From the fun creatures that show all different moods to the fun poems that are catchy and true! This is a great book for kids and adults to read when they are not feeling like themselves! It is also a great tool to get children to talk about their feelings. I am happy to say that there are 9 different feelings covered in this book. From your basic mood of being mad and needing to take a deep breath to the mood of being worried and learning not to sweat the small stuff! This book should be in every library! I am giving this book a 5/5. I was given a copy, all opinions are my own.

reviewed by Vicky on the Deal Sharing Aunt blog ]

Here’s what some other reviewers are saying:

Sometimes it’s hard for kids to deal with all of the various emotions that go on inside of everybody. One minute you can be happy and the next minute sad. This book doesn’t call them feelings, they’re called Spiffy Kids. Sometimes children don’t know what to do with all the emotions they are feeling. They are given help with that in this book. They get to know their emotions in an interesting and helpful way. They get to see that they aren’t the only ones feeling these things. Everyone does. This is a fun and interesting way for children to get to know their feelings through the characters in the book. They will get to know that the Spiffy Kids are right there with them all the time. The characters are given names of emotions which help the child have fun, such as Mad, Happy, Sad, Shy and Worry along with many others. There are cute colorful pictures of the Spiffy Kids that show their emotions so that the child reading can relate. I particularly liked the quote from the book, “No one’s going to make me feel bad about being me! Because I’m bold! I’m brave! so self-assured! Don’t you agree?! What a wonderful, fun way for children to learn about and deal with their emotions. Every child should have this book on their shelf to read and re-read when those emotions kick in.

– Amazon Reviewer gayle pace

Spiffy Kids is a great imaginative way to introduce children to each emotion, especially ones that they have trouble dealing with or identifying. The characters are cute and adorably goofy with expressions of the emotions that their feeling and with postscript added in. Each Spiffy Kid has a different color that they represent with emotion, each emotion are enjoyable or displeasing, either way it’s  cleverly written in short rhythm to keep young minds interested. The characters suggests readers to try new things and how to deal with the emotions that their feeling, also how the feelings come about and how to recognize the stages of that emotion.

The wonderful fun colors on the characters will keep the children entertain as they stroll through the pages learning about each emotion without feeling that they’re being engulfed with the feeling of overwhelming with emotion. So sit down with your child and I guarantee that you will also have fun with Spiffy Kids as much as the child you’re sharing it with.

– Amazon Reviewer Oh My Bookness

Video Trailer:


saturday self-published book review

Thanks for reading!  Keep up with the latest in the world of indie and self-published books by watching this space every Saturday!

Self Publishing Advisor

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Conversations: 7/7/2017

IT’S JULY!

TIME TO CELEBRATE OUR FREEDOM TO WRITE!

WOULD YOU give up your freedom—your physical freedom—if you were threatened with imprisonment or death if you kept writing and continued to publish your work? I’ve often wondered if I have the stamina and courage it takes to make such a commitment. I’ve also wondered about the writers of our own Declaration of Independence who risked not only their lives (and the lives of their families and friends) in penning of those words.

In November of 1775, when the Continental Congress was attempting to negotiate “fair terms” with “the Homeland,” Thomas Jefferson wrote this statement: Believe me, dear Sir: there is not in the British empire a man who more cordially loves a union with Great Britain than I do. But, by the God that made me, I will cease to exist before I yield to a connection on such terms as the British Parliament proposes; and in this, I think I speak the sentiments of America.

Did he know those were “fightin’ words?” Probably. There had already been fighting in the city streets and countryside (Boston Tea Party, 1773), and there would be more because British Commanders were ordered to make it plain that Parliament was the “supreme authority” and anything that Parliament did was constitutional. However our colony ancestors had developed different ideas—that citizens had “fundamental rights” that no government could violate, not even Parliament.

So it was that by 1774, writers, such as Samuel Adams, James Wilson and Thomas Jefferson produced documents stating that the colonies, with their own legislatures, were connected to the rest of the “empire” ONLY through their allegiance to the Crown.

What would have happened if WRITERS—men and women whose skills and abilities allowed them to “wordsmith” the thoughts of a nation—had not accepted their role? What would have happened if these writers refused to listen to the hopes of Freedom that drove their families across the ocean? Only about half the women colonists were able to write, however, they spoke loudly through Abigail Adams (wife of John Adams) who sent him a letter while he attended the Second Continental Congress. “Remember the ladies” while you’re shaping this new nation, she wrote. If you don’t “we are determined to foment a rebellion and will not hold ourselves bound by any laws in which we have no voice or representation.”journal mug coffee

Thomas Paine agreed with her about having a voice and published his Common Sense pamphlet (50-pages) that urged Americans to fight not only against taxation but for their independence. It sold more than half-a-million copies within a few months’ time.

The legacy we writers hold in our hands and hearts, as we develop the genres we’re drawn to, is as close to home as our living rooms and the pages we read to our children and as far-reaching as future generations will carry it—whatever format that might look like. With all my heart, I encourage you to write, and publish! You are the only person on this planet who can produce the works that are spinning in your thoughts.

The world is waiting. ⚓︎

 


Royalene

ABOUT ROYALENE DOYLE: Royalene has been writing something since before kindergarten days and continues to love the process. Through her small business—DOYLE WRITING SERVICES—she brings more than 40 years of writing experience to authors who need “just a little assistance” with completing their projects. This is a nice fit as she develops these blogs for Outskirts Press (OP) a leading self-publisher, and occasionally accepts a ghostwriting project from one of their clients. Her recent book release (with OP) titled FIREPROOF PROVERBS, A Writer’s Study of Words, is already receiving excellent reviews including several professional writer’s endorsements given on the book’s back cover.
Royalene’s writing experience grew through a wide variety of positions from Office Manager and Administrative Assistant to Teacher of Literature and Advanced Writing courses and editor/writer for an International Christian ministry. Her willingness to listen to struggling authors, learn their goals and expectations and discern their writing voice has brought many manuscripts into the published books arena.

In Your Corner: Put a Schedule On It

Holiday suitcase

Look, summer presents unique challenges to writers, doesn’t it? By July, everyone’s deep into their vacations, children are running riot while out of school, family streams in and out in a series of reunions, and … it can be hard to continue writing.

Of course … there are remedies. And this week, I suggest trying your hand at a schedule––and then, of all things, sticking to it!

Now, those who know me well know that I’m not aways given over to structured practicalities and organizational tricks. I know how to kick back and relax, especially in summer. After all, if you work in publishing or with authors, as I do, you’ll know that victories are hard-won and well worth celebrating! So … don’t take this as heavy-handed pontification from someone who’s eminently hypocritical. I often suggest many things which I do not myself do all the time, since I’m as firm a believer in changing the habits to fit the situation as I am that success in self-publishing is the nexus of persistence, skill, and good luck.

I recommend schedules for everyone. If not for always, than for a season––and there’s no better season to try your hand at scheduling in summer, when the emotional, physical, and social stakes are so high … and very little writing is getting done anyways, so why not try a new approach? You may be writing by a pool with a mimosa at your side, but you can still work a schedule like nobody’s business, and churn out more writing than you would otherwise. Anyone with a plan can make it work!

In garden a woman surfing on internet with laptop.

Oh … but a plan? How do I come up with one of those?

Here’s where I get a little bit … experimental. As the first step to developing a schedule, I recommend starting a bullet journal. You have probably heard this term before, and associated it with highly neurotic, organized, possibly even OCD? people with phenomenal artistic skills. sure did, and refused to start a bullet journal, until I dug into a great conversation at the local library with a young mother named Melissa.

Melissa bullet journals. No surprise there! But wow, she has zero artistic skills. I mean, not a single artistic bone in her body! She was a bit reticent to show me her bullet journal, since she felt insecure about the lettering and such, but I was eventually able to persuade her. And I was incredibly impressed! Melissa has gotten to the heart of what a bullet journal is all about, which is to say, she started hers with lists––shopping lists, to-do lists, etc––and by tracking the little things she does throughout the day. Then she took it one step further and started to set goals … once she knew what her days usually already looked like, and what was feasible.

That, my friends and dear readers, is the value of a bullet journal. It can eventually help you shape behaviors, yes, but first it shows you what you already do––and therefore, what you’re already good at, and maybe some areas to work on. It’s like Google Analytics, but for a person’s daily productivity!

Printable Journaling Cards with Rooster Illustration. Line Style

You can put a bullet journal to work describing your days and then use the data you gather––when meals happen, what they look like, how many hours you’re sleeping a night, what your weekly and daily commitments look like and how they change in the summer––to transform or tweak your schedule just a little to squeak some more writing in. Poolside, or otherwise.

It’s all about sustainability. Radically altering your writing behaviors without a plan just isn’t a good idea––and it isn’t, ultimately, sustainable. Small changes are great, however, and over time you can build one change upon another until your summers are your most productive months, rather than the opposite! But it starts with knowing where you are, first.

If you’re looking for insight into bullet journaling, hop on Google or YouTube! There are literally thousands of them out there, but beware: many are a bit deceiving, touting life-altering effects and demonstrating uncannily beautiful hand lettering skills. You don’t have to make all the big changes at once, and you don’t need to be a gifted artist to figure out a better summer schedule by bullet journaling!

Still, here’s a quick snippet to get you started:

You are not alone. ♣︎


Elizabeth

ABOUT ELIZABETH JAVOR: With over 18 years of experience in sales and management, Elizabeth Javor works as the Manager of Author Services for Outskirts Press. The Author Services Department is composed of knowledgeable publishing consultants, pre-production specialists, customer service reps and book marketing specialists; together, they all focus on educating authors on the self-publishing process to help them publish the book of their dreams. Whether you are a professional looking to take your career to the next level with platform-driven non-fiction or a novelist seeking fame, fortune, and/or personal fulfillment, Elizabeth Javor can put you on the right path.

Easy Breezy Summer Publishing (Part 1)

july 5th fifth

We all know that self-publishing and independence go together, right? Or at least, that’s the general idea, and the ultimate goal. We kick off the constraints of the traditional publishing houses, their heavy-handed contracts and royalties disputes, and waft our way over to the Elysian fields of indie bliss ….

But that’s not how self-publishing works, is it? Yes, you’re independent, but independence comes with a price tag. And this isn’t some fatalistic attempt to push you, our readers, towards traditional publishing (believe me! we hate it as much as you do!). The fact remains, however, that when it comes to self-publishing, you get what you pay for, and the rest you accomplish through elbow grease.

So … how does one market as an independent, self-publishing author? Is it even possible to rival the promotional work of the Big Five when all you have is a halfway decent laptop, debatable graphic design skills, and very little free time? How do we break free from Big Business but still sell books?!

The simple answer is: it’s hard … but totally possible. And we’ll dive into some of the pros, cons, and various logistics over the Wednesdays to come. Stay tuned for more musings on a marketing theme! (And say that ten times fast.)

Tomorrow, Royalene will be talking about how self-publishing intersect with the personal freedoms we so value here on our side of the pond. Watch her space for more excellent “independence” advice on Friday mornings this summer!


Thank you for reading!  If you have any questions, comments, suggestions, or contributions, please use the comment field below or drop us a line at selfpublishingadvice@gmail.com.  And remember to check back each Wednesday for your weekly dose of marketing musings from one indie, hybrid, and self-published author to another. ♠


Kelly

ABOUT KELLY SCHUKNECHT: Kelly Schuknecht is the Executive Vice President of Outskirts Press. In addition to her contributions to the Outskirts Press blog at blog.outskirtspress.com, Kelly and a group of talented marketing experts offer book marketing services, support, and products to not only published Outskirts Press authors, but to all authors and professionals who are interested in marketing their books and/or careers. Learn more about Kelly on her blog, kellyschuknecht.com