Self Publishing Book Review of the Week: The Peruke Maker

The Peruke Maker

by Ruby Dominguez

This self-published book was recently reviewed by Able Greenspan of Midwest Book Review:

Dozens of innocents were killed for no reason during the Salem Witch Trials. Someone will pay. “The Peruke Maker: The Salem Witch Hunter Curse” is a story of a curse of the innocents that ravages Salem hundreds of years later. Sarah, a twenty first century girl, is faced with the curse, and now she must end it or be just another victim. “The Peruke Maker” is an intriguing mystery and a highly recommended read.

For more information or to order the book, visit the author’s webpage: www.outskirtspress.com/ThePerukeMaker


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Back to Writing on the Road to Self-Publishing

Ezines – they are a fast and free opportunity to self publish. Moreover, publishing in ezines can help you get motivated to write your book, and even promote your book after publication.

We’ve discussed the idea of publishing excerpts of your book as individual articles or stories. You can simply locate a website and query that site’s webmaster about publishing your article. Make sure you include your biographical byline, which mentions your book as well.

This is more of the same, but concentrating on ezine publication.

There really are countless ezines in existence now, each with a specific niche or category. And all of them are voraciously hungry for content.

Rather than seeking them out individually, you can place your articles into databases that ezine editors frequent for content. They use your article free of charge, and in exchange, include your biographical byline, which, again, includes information about you and your book.

Here are some to check out:

http://www.ezinearticles.com

http://www.ebooksnbytes.com

http://www.connectionteam.com

http://www.netterweb.com

http://www.ideamarketers.com

http://www.goarticles.com

http://www.knowledge-finder.com

http://www.articlecity.com

Don’t send an article you’ve already published last week. Instead, write another chapter of your book first (since finishing your book the main goal, after all.)

Have fun. Keep writing.



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Self Publishing Book Review of the Week: The College Survival Guide

The College Survival Guide

by Karven, Mobeir & Howe

This self-published book was recently reviewed by Susan Bethany of Midwest Book Review:

College is a time of survival, just not from one traditionally needs to survive. “The College Survival Guide: Beer Games, Hangover Remedies, and Much More!” is a guide for the future alcoholics of America just getting their start in College and the joys of drinking. Filled with fun ideas for activities involving America’s favorite beverage, “The College Survival Guide” is a read that anyone college drinker should consider.

For more information or to order the book, visit the author’s webpage: www.outskirtspress.com/collegesurvivalguide


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Self Publishing Book Review of the Week: The Bare Melcessities

The Bare Melcessities

by Melanie Lutz

This self-published book was recently reviewed by Susan Bethany of Midwest Book Review:

Living under the cover of one’s own insecurities is no way to live. “The Bare Melcessities: A Self-Portrait” is an inspirational memoir where author Melanie Lutz encourages readers to find themselves and bring out their truth to the forefront, and bare it all to the world for a lighter burden. “The Bare Melcessities” is a fascinating and motivational read that should not be overlooked.

For more information or to order the book, visit the author’s webpage: www.outskirtspress.com/thebaremelcessities


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Self Publishing Book Review of the Week: Murder with a French Accent

Murder with a French Accent

by Janet Hannah

This self-published book was recently reviewed by Shelley Glodowski of Midwest Book Review:

Janet Hannah was born in Toronto, Canada. She earned a Ph.D. in Rutgers University. MURDER WITH A FRENCH ACCENT is the follow-up to her first Alex Kertesz mystery, THE WISH TO KILL, which was well received. She currently lives in Jerusalem.

 

Alex Kertesz has been tapped by his department at the University of Jerusalem to journey to a small French company who has acquired the rights to an organism for commercial development. Located in Toulouse, France, Alex arrives to a somewhat hostile atmosphere and little to be done on the surface of things. But an explosion in the lab; snide comments; and finally his own kidnapping convince him that all is not well at Agrogenie:

 

“‘I have to catch a plane,’ he said, extricating himself from her grasp, but the large man he now thought of as Boris appeared at his other side, pressing him toward the open door of a parked car. He spun around to make a dash for it, but Francoise blocked the way, and something hard and heavy smashed into the back of his head.”

 

Writing about something as complicated as biochemistry is not an easy task, particularly when the intended audience is mystery readers. But Janet Hannah pulls it off with aplomb, breaking complicated theory down into pedestrian language when the occasion calls for it. Dr. Alex is a reluctant traveler and hero in this whodunit, and Hannah has to spend quite of bit of the book putting everything into context for the reader.

 

But when Hannah gets around to the murder, she totally changes gears to create mayhem as Dr. Alex finds himself pulled into the vortex of a situation he hardly understands. It’s lucky that he is fluent in so many languages and that he has kept himself in good shape. He is called upon to perform stunts worthy of James Bond, and that’s where the real fun of the novel lies.

MURDER WITH A FRENCH ACCENT is a nicely wrought International mystery.

For more information or to order the book, visit the author’s webpage: www.outskirtspress.com/murderwithafrenchaccent


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